Saint John's Herald Newsletter
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June 27, 2014, 11:33 PM

June 27, 2014

The St. John's Herald

The voice of the Episcopal Church in Lake County

St. John's Church

(Episcopal)

1190 North Forbes Street, Lakeport, California 95453

 

You can reach Fr. Leo at 349-6563 or e-mail frleo@yahoo.com

2014 Vestry: 

Susanne La Faver, Senior Warden, susanne.lafaver@att.net;

Lyle La Faver, Junior Warden, llafaver@att.net

Nancy Carter, nancyccarter@yahoo.com

Alethea Eason, aletheason@gmail.com

Leila Haddah, ldh1218@sbcglobal.net

 Nancy Williams, nancyawilliamscnm@gmail.com.

 

St. John’s Church vision statement:

We are a visible, welcoming family of Christ, 

resolved to deepen our relationship with God.

 

June 27, 2014

Dear Folks,

 My e-mail account is still not able to receive incoming messages, so please continue to contact me using St. John’s e-mail account (stjohnslakeport@gmail.com) and put “att. Fr. Leo” in the subject space. I have an appointment on Monday with a “techie” who will hopefully get things straightened out. This Sunday we will wind up June with the Bishop Barry’s biannual visitation on June 29th

And yes, I plan take the first Sunday of July off to rest and recuperate. Maybe, if I’m up to it, I will be able to get taken over to the Coast for the 4th of July weekend.

All in all, I’ve been holding up pretty well through all this, but the past few days I’m not feeling my best. I am planing to reduce my work load at the end of June by only putting outThe Herald once a month for July, August, and September. So when you do not receive your weekly Herald after June, don’t panic!    

    Please continue to keep me in your prayers and love as I  keep going, for as long as it is God’s Will, to serve you as your parish priest.      

    God love you,

Fr. Leo+

 

Organ Music for Sunday, June 29th

Prelude: The Church's One Foundation arranged by P. Bunjes, Concordia 1900's

Offertory: The Lord Will Come arranged by P. Manz, Concordia 1900's

Postlude: Fugue on the Kyrie by F. Couperin, France 1600's

Mel Taylor, Parish Organist

 

THE BISHOP IS COMING, 

THE BISHOP IS COMING!!!

On Sunday, June 29th, The Right Reverend Barry L. Beisner, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Northern California, will make his official parochial visitation to St. John’s, Lakeport. This is one of the most important events in the life of a parish in The Episcopal Church, connecting the local congregation to the area diocese, the national church, and ultimately the worldwide Anglican Communion.

When the bishop is with us he will preside at the celebration of Holy Eucharist, preach, administer Confirmation to Greg Leake and formally receive Elizabeth Leake into The Episcopal Church, who come from another church tradition. His visit also offers all of us an opportunity to reaffirm our commitment to The Episcopal Church by renewing our Baptismal Vows. Afterwards Bishop Barry will wish to meet and speak with Vestry members and those present at the Hospitality Hour.

The most important thing you can do is to make firm plans to be present at St. John’s on June 29th to welcome the bishop and receive the blessings of his visit. I’ll be there also! 

Fr. Leo+

 

In your love, please pray for the repose of the soul Michael Reeves, the husband of Bishop Mary Gray-Reeves. Please remember her and their daughter Katie, and their family in your thoughts and prayers. It is with the deepest regret and sadness that we inform you that Bishop Mary’s husband Michael died in a tragic bicycle accident this past week.  Our prayers go out to all who loved him, and all the people of the Diocese of El Camino Real. Please keep Deacon Bryan in your prayers, as Bishop Mary is officially his bishop We will provide additional information early next week. Thank you for your prayers of support.

 

Four Ways In Which Social Media Works In People's Spiritual Lives

by Ann Fontaine on June 22, 2014 8:50 AM 

Loud voices often tell us that social media is an enemy of community, faith and love. It isolates us, dehumanizes us and too often divides us, the critics claim. They are, in some ways, right. Any form of communication can and does tend to challenge existing ideas about how we should interact. The radio, for example, replaced family and community gatherings that had been a primary form of entertainment for much of America.

But there is good in social media too. I am fascinated by a project one of my former students at the University of St. Thomas Law School, Mikel Podgursky McLaughlin, calls "We're Friends, Right?" He is chasing down all of his 500+ Facebook friends in person to make the connection human and real.

As part of that project, he met me at a Minneapolis restaurant called Hell's Kitchen for breakfast. We had a remarkable conversation; among other things he revealed that my students often speculated about my faith, based on the things I had talked about in class. We had a wonderful, fresh, challenging conversation that I have been thinking about since.

Could that discussion have happened over Facebook? Probably not. But could it have happened without Facebook? No, because I would have lost touch with Mikel the way teachers usually do with their former students. In that subtle difference lies the gap between Facebook's challenge to spirituality and the spiritual opportunities that it offers. It may not be the house in which spirituality lives, but it can be the door to that house. Let's consider four ways in which social media works in people's spiritual lives:

1. It keeps us in community.

There are hundreds of people who know what is going on with me because of Facebook, and I follow them as well. A common, and correct, criticism of social media is that people tend to interact with people online rather than in-person. However, Facebook also allows some connection to people who otherwise would be lost to us: the second cousins, the high school acquaintances and the people I knew two jobs back. Part of what those people see is the life of my church through what I post, and that is a good thing. We baptize infants in the burbling creek beside the church each year. When I post photos, I hear from people coming from all parts of my life.

2. It accommodates gentle reconciliations.

The first step in mending relationships is usually very simple: Someone comes home for Thanksgiving or picks up the phone. Facebook and other social media make that first step easier, and allows for a gradual re-acquaintance. Perhaps we trust social media because it offers us control as we make ourselves vulnerable -- we can limit what other people see and know even as we begin a do-over. The next step is important, of course, but without that first step there is nothing.

3. It can enable and further worship.

Several times a year, I get to give sermons in various churches. I love doing it, and enjoy getting to know new congregations. I will usually float the ideas for my sermon online, and get reactions from others, and love to discuss them afterwards with people I may have missed or do not know. The one breach in the seeming ban on bad news on social media comes in the form of prayer requests, where people reach out to others in times of hardship. What is wrong with that? Facebook is no substitute for prayer or for worship services, but it can be a way to share both.

4. It helps to welcome the stranger.

As a Christian and an introvert, Christ's directive to welcome the stranger is a tough one for me. I'm awkward at meeting people, and struggle to reach out in person to those I don't know. Even for those in need, it is tough for me to respond face-to-face. I have found that social media can be a bridge to those people -- if I reach out to them online first, it lets me do so in-person down the road. The traditional model is flipped, in that I am meeting people online first and then in person, rather than making my existing friends my Facebook friends.

Social media is a tool, like the written word, the printing press, the radio, and television. How we use it will define our successes in all parts of our lives, and our spiritual lives are no exception.

 

Presiding Bishop’s 2014 World Refugee Day Message

June 19, 2014

[Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release]  “Remember in prayer all who flee persecution and suffering in search of security and peace, remember the baptismal promise to strive for justice and peace, and reaffirm our commitment to welcoming the stranger as Christ himself,” Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori states in her 2014 World Refugee Day message.

World Refugee Day is June 20, and in her message, the Presiding Bishop also heralds the work of Episcopal Migration Ministries (EMM) for its extensive resettlement and advocacy efforts.

The following is Presiding Bishop Jefferts Schori’s message.

 

2014 World Refugee Day

“I was a stranger and you welcomed me.”

On June 20, communities across the globe will celebrate World Refugee Day, honoring the strength, resilience, and contributions of refugees. In 2014, the world has seen the heights to which refugees can rise when given the chance to start a new life in dignity and peace. A former refugee became the first American citizen in a generation to win the Boston Marathon. At the same time the world has been challenged by the ongoing and urgent need to protect the vulnerable fleeing conflicts in Syria, South Sudan, the Congo, Myanmar, and Central Africa. This World Refugee Day, The Episcopal Church honors the proud legacy of our Church’s intentional work of welcoming refugees – a ministry that began in 1939 through the Presiding Bishop’s Fund for World Relief.

The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees estimates that there are currently more than 15 million refugees worldwide, the majority of whom are women and children. These vulnerable individuals have fled their homes, often with little more than the clothes on their backs, and frequently leaving family members behind. Less than 1% of these 15 million refugees will ever be resettled in a third country. Many will live out their lives in uncertainty or the indignity of refugee “camps,” as essentially stateless persons. The United States has a proud tradition of resettling more refugees each year than any other receiving country, and since 1988 Episcopal Migration Ministries (EMM) has partnered with the U.S. government to welcome refugees into new communities.

In 2013 alone, EMM helped almost 5,000 refugees build new lives in security and peace in 30 communities across the United States. To carry out this work, EMM collaborates with local partner agencies in 26 Episcopal dioceses and 22 states to welcome those fleeing violence and persecution. This ministry links public funding with private donations and volunteers to accompany refugees through their first months in the United States. Each year, EMM welcomes an ever-diversifying refugee population – from more than 69 nations to date. The EMM affiliate network includes staff and volunteers who provide refugees with the essentials needed as they begin their new lives in the U.S., including housing, food, furnishings, and orientation to life in their new communities. That assistance includes connection to services like English classes and job training, access to health care, enrolling their children in school, and understanding the other services available in the community. Our communities and congregations are in turn enriched socially, culturally, and spiritually by the presence and contributions of refugees.

This World Refugee Day, remember in prayer all who flee persecution and suffering in search of security and peace, remember the baptismal promise to strive for justice and peace, and reaffirm our commitment to welcoming the stranger as Christ himself.

The Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts Schori

Presiding Bishop and Primate

The Episcopal Church

 

Obispa Presidente de la Iglesia Episcopal presenta Mensaje de 2014 del Día Mundial de los Refugiados

[19 de junio de 2014] 

“Recuerde en oración a todos los que huyen de la persecución y el sufrimiento y que buscan la seguridad y la paz, recuerde la promesa bautismal de luchar por la justicia y la paz, y reafirmar nuestro compromiso de dar la bienvenida al extraño como al mismo Cristo”, la Obispa Presidente de la Iglesia Episcopal Katharine Jefferts Schori indica en su mensaje de 2014 del Día Mundial de los Refugiados.

El Día Mundial de los Refugiados es el 20 de junio, y en su mensaje, la Obispa Presidente también anuncia la obra del Ministerio Episcopal de Migración (EMM) y sus grandes esfuerzos de reasentamiento y defensoría.

A continuación el mensaje de la Obispa Presidente Jefferts Schori.

Día Mundial de los Refugiados 2014

Fui forastero y me acogisteis.

El 20 de junio, las comunidades de todo el mundo celebrarán el Día Mundial del Refugiado, en honor a la fuerza, resistencia, y a las contribuciones de los refugiados. En el 2014, el mundo ha podido ver lo tan alto que pueden llegar los refugiados cuando se les brinda la oportunidad de empezar una vida nueva con dignidad y paz. Un ex refugiado se convirtió en el primer ciudadano estadounidense en una generación al ganar el maratón de Boston. Al mismo tiempo, el mundo ha sido cuestionado por la necesidad continua y urgente de proteger a los vulnerables que huyen de los conflictos en Siria, Sudán del Sur, el Congo, Myanmar, y África Central. En este Día Mundial del Refugiado, la Iglesia Episcopal honra el legado de orgullo del trabajo intencional de nuestra Iglesia al acoger a los refugiados – un ministerio que comenzó en 1939 a través del Fondo de la Obispa Presidente para Ayuda Mundial.

El Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Refugiados estima que actualmente hay más de 15 millones de refugiados en todo el mundo, la mayoría de los cuales son mujeres y niños. Estos individuos vulnerables han huido de sus hogares, a menudo con poco más que la ropa que llevaban puesta, y con frecuencia dejando atrás a familiares. Menos del 1% de estos 15 millones de refugiados nunca serán re-establecidos en un tercer país. Muchos vivirán sus vidas en la incertidumbre o en la indignidad de “campos” para refugiados como personas esencialmente sin patria. Los Estados Unidos tiene una orgullosa tradición de reasentar a refugiados cada año y más que en cualquier otro país que los recibe, y desde 1988 el Ministerio Episcopal de Migración (EMM) se han asociado con el gobierno de los EE.UU. para recibir a los refugiados en nuevas comunidades.

Sólo en 2013, el Ministerio Episcopal de Migración ayudó a casi 5.000 refugiados a construir una nueva vida con seguridad y paz en 30 comunidades de los Estados Unidos. Para llevar a cabo este trabajo, la EMM colabora con agencias locales asociadas en 26 diócesis episcopales y 22 estados para dar la bienvenida a quienes huyen de la violencia y la persecución. Este ministerio vincula la financiación pública con donaciones privadas y voluntarios para acompañar a los refugiados a través de sus primeros meses que están en los Estados Unidos. Cada año, la EMM da la bienvenida a una población diversificada de refugiados – de más de 69 países hasta la fecha. La red de afiliados EMM incluye el personal y los voluntarios que proporcionan a los refugiados con los elementos necesarios a medida que comienzan su nueva vida en los EE.UU., lo cual incluye vivienda, la alimentación, el mobiliario, y la orientación sobre la vida en sus nuevas comunidades. Esa asistencia incluye la conexión a servicios como clases de inglés y capacitación para el trabajo, el acceso a la asistencia sanitaria, inscripción a sus hijos en la escuela, y tener un mejor conocimiento sobre los otros servicios disponibles en la comunidad. Nuestras comunidades y congregaciones están a su vez enriquecidas socialmente, culturalmente y espiritualmente por la presencia y las contribuciones de los refugiados.

En este Día Mundial del Refugiado, recuerde en oración a todos los que huyen de la persecución y el sufrimiento y que buscan la seguridad y la paz, recuerde la promesa bautismal de luchar por la justicia y la paz, y reafirmar nuestro compromiso de dar la bienvenida al extraño como al mismo Cristo.

La Reverendísima Katharine Jefferts Schori

Obispa Presidente y Primada

La Iglesia Episcopal

 

Morality Should Not Be Priced in the Marketplace   From The New York Times

(This is something for Christians to think about. There are no easy or one sided answers, but if we profess belief in the teachings of Jesus as recorded in the Gospels, than we have to be ready to examine our collective actions in light of those principles. Each of us come to it from a different perspective, but we all will have to be accountable before Jesus on the day of reckoning. Fr. Leo)

Gary Dorrien, the Reinhold Niebuhr professor of social ethics at Union Theological Seminary and a professor of religion at Columbia University, is the author, most recently, of "Kantian Reason and Hegelian Spirit: The Idealistic Logic of Modern Theology."

UPDATED JUNE 26, 2014, 9:14 AM

Capitalism, like Christianity, is not just one thing. Capitalism operates differently in varying political and cultural contexts, and Western Christianity managed to accommodate the Roman Empire, feudalism and early nationalism before it accommodated the rise of the bourgeoisie and modern democracy. The perennial question asked here, however, is pressing hard on us again, because economic globalization has unleashed the predatory logic of capitalism, devastated trade union movements and shrunken the restraining capacities of governments.

Capitalism thrives on selfish impulses that Christian moral teaching condemns, and neo-classical economic theory mythologizes a supposedly “natural” free market that never existed anywhere. Thus the question is perennially relevant, simplistic binaries notwithstanding. Early economies were built on social obligations, as were the feudal economies in which Catholic theologians developed theories of distributive justice and the common good. Then the founders of neo-classical theory fashioned a supposedly natural “laissez-faire” ideal that was, in fact, carefully designed to serve the interests of the bourgeois class.

The field I teach, social ethics, was founded in the late 19th century as a protest against capitalist ideology. American social gospel theologian Walter Rauschenbusch put it poignantly: "Capitalism has overdeveloped the selfish instincts in all of us and left the capacity of devotion to larger ends shrunken and atrophied." Pope Leo XIII described capitalism as a system defined by the callousness of employers and the greed of unrestrained competition, including its drive to leave workers isolated and defenseless.

These founders of Christian social ethics recoiled at the predatory logic of capitalism. They perceived that unfettered capitalism would corrupt everything it touched by turning labor, nature and everything else into a commodity. A century later, it is not even debatable whether American capitalism has turned American society into an adjunct of the market.

Nothing is exempt from economic rationality and the pressure of competition. Social contracts have vanished under threats of obsolescence and ruin. Wages have been flat for 35 years and inequality has worsened dramatically. The share of income in the United States held by the top 1 percent has more than doubled since 1982. The ostensible purpose of Wall Street is to finance the making of things in the real economy, but Wall Street has fallen in love with derivatives and the big banks have become giant hedge funds trading on their own accounts.

Those who control the terms, amounts and direction of credit play the dominant role in determining the kind of society the rest of us live in. The figures playing this role in our society do not even pretend to care about anything except making more money for themselves. They are losers or suckers if they say anything else. This fact has reached the upcoming generation of social ethicists. Many of them do not find Rauschenbusch to be radical at all. They wonder why their field stopped talking about capitalism in the 1950s.

 

Urgent prayer, help needed for Iraq’s Christians

By ACNS staff | June 16, 2014 

[Anglican Communion News Service] 

In the wake of the growing crisis in Iraq, a plea for prayer and help has been issued by the Diocese of Cyprus and the Gulf and the Anglican vicar of St. George’s Church in Baghdad.

An estimated half a million people, including hundreds of Christian families, are fleeing the area with many attempting to find refuge in the nearby Kurdish provinces of Northern Iraq. At least one Assyrian church in Mosul has been burned down in the recent violence.

A statement from the diocese said that Christians are feeling particularly vulnerable, “especially in light of the treatment of Christians in the Raqqah province of northern Syria where ISIS* has also established its authority.

“Recall that, in February 2014, ISIS commanders in Raqqah forced Christian community leaders to sign a contract agreeing to a set of stringent conditions. These included the payment of a special tax (known as jizya), conduct of Christian rites only behind closed doors so as to be neither visible nor audible to Muslims, and adherence to Islamic commercial, dress code and dietary regulations.

“Mosul and the surrounding Nineveh plain is the traditional heartland of Iraq’s Christian communities. Many Christians fled to this region when forced to leave Baghdad and other areas in recent years. Christians are alarmed at the ISIS take-over of Mosul, fearful that this will further accelerate the decline of the Christian presence in Iraq.”

The statement said Christians in the country have asked for prayer for the following issues:

The Christians of Mosul will know the close presence of Jesus, the guidance of the Spirit and the protection of the Father

Those who have chosen to remain in the city would not be subjected to violent or unjust treatment

Humanitarian assistance would reach all who are in need, whether having been displaced or remaining in Mosul

Christians throughout Iraq will know the peace and presence of Jesus each day, and will remain faithful to him and clear in their testimony

The Iraqi authorities will act decisively to improve security for all citizens of Iraq.

Anglican vicar of St. George’s Church in Baghdad, Canon Andrew White, also issued an appeal entitled “Please, please help us in this crisis”. Canon White who has lost hundreds of his congregation to the violence over the years, said Iraq was facing its worst crisis since 2003. 

“ISIS, a group that does not even see Al Qaida as extreme enough, has moved into Mosul, which is Nineveh. It has totally taken control, destroyed all government departments. Allowed all prisoners out of the prisons. Killed countless numbers of people. There are bodies over the streets. The army and police have fled, so many of the military resources have been captured. Tankers, armed vehicles and even helicopters are now in the hands of ISIS.”

Writing on the Foundation for Relief and Reconciliation in the Middle East, Canon Andrew said his work at St. George’s–providing a spiritual home, medical care and humanitarian relief as well as promoting reconciliation amongst different religious groups–is inevitably suffering.

“The summer is by far our worst time of the year for support,” he writes. “Both our Foundation in the UK and US have seriously had to reduce our funding. We are in a desperate crisis. So many of our people had returned their homes in Nineveh for the summer now they are stuck in this total carnage unable to even escape. We desperately need help so that we can help the Christians of this broken land just get through this new crisis. Please can you help us, we are desperate.

The terrible fact is that ISIS are in the control now of Fallujah in the South and Mosul in the North they could now move down towards Baghdad between the two and cause a total crisis there. So to be honest I don’t know what to do, do I stay or go back? I have a huge amount of commitments here. If I go back, I cannot change the situation but I want to be with my people. Here we are with this huge crisis and need and we do not even have the resources to help those most in need.”

For more information on supporting Canon White’s ministry visit http://frrme.org/please-please-help-us-crisis/

*the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria Group

 

.

Coming up...   

Sunday, June 29th: Third Sunday after Pentecost. 10 am Holy Eucharist celebrated by The Rt. Rev. Barry L. Beisner, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Northern California 

Sunday, July 6th, 4th Sunday after Pentecost. 10 am Morning Prayer (Fr. Leo’s Sunday off ).

 

JUNE BIRTHDAYS and ANNIVERSARIES

On June 3rd - Mel Taylor and Susan McCarty, on the 8th - Vicky Maley, on the 9th - JuneSalter, on the 10th - Ginger Ingersoll, on the 13th - Russell Patterson, and on the 18 - BillEason. 

Happy Anniversary on the 25th to Vicky & John Maley! 

 

Healing Service at St. John’s

Next Sunday, July 6th, St. John's will celebrate its first Sunday of the month healing service after the Morning Prayer Service. Every quarter we will do a Public Healing Service before Holy Eucharist. We are all ministers of Christ's love and any member of the St. John's family is invited to lead either the regular service or the quarterly one. Both services are taken from The Episcopal Church’s The Book of Occasional Services and easy to follow. You are welcome to do this only once, if that is your preference, and no long term commitment need be made. If you feel called to perform this ministry, please speak to Alethea Eason or contact her at 355-0553 or aletheaeason@gmail.com

       

Prayer for the Kidnapped Nigerian Girls 

May 2014

O God, we cry out to you

for the lives and the freedom

of the 276 kidnapped girls in Nigeria.

In their time of danger and fear,

pour out your strong Spirit for them.  

Make a way home for them in safety. 

Make a way back for them

to the education that will lift them up. 

Hold them in the knowledge 

that they are not captive slaves, 

they are not purchased brides,

but they are your beloved daughters,

and precious in your sight.  

Change the hearts and minds of their kidnappers

and of all who choose violence against women and girls.

Cast down the mighty from their seat,

and lift up the humble and meek,

through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Written by Elizabeth Smith, Diocese of Perth, Australia

 

 

Your Favorite Hymns

We're conducting a survey to learn your favorite hymns, so that we can sing them more often on Sunday morning.  The form is in the program each Sunday morning to fill out and submit.  Or send an e-mail to Leila at ldh1218@sbcglobal.net or to Anne at k9hobbyhome@gmail.com with your favorites, no limit.  We need only the Hymn number and first line.

 

Prayer List

The Prayer List was edited last week.  If we have removed someone still in need of our prayers or if you have anyone else to add, please contact Leila at ldh1218@sbcglobal.net or (707) 263-4565.

 

A New Parish Directory is in the Works   

Arden Hyatt has agreed to create a new St. John’s parish roster, once she gets everybody’s updated information. Please double-check your addresses, e-mails and phone numbers in the sample roster on the narthex table at the rear of the church. We want to stay in touch with all of you! And, thank you, Arden for your valuable roster ministry!

Suzanne LaFaver 

  

ALTAR GUILD

The Altar Guild is looking for new members, if this is a ministry you would like to be a part of or if you would like more information please contact Barbara Knight, or another Altar Guild member.

 

 

From Lesser Feasts and Fasts...

June 29 ~ Saint Peter and Saint Paul, Apostles

Peter and Paul, the two greatest leaders of the early Church, are commemorated separately, Peter on January 18, for his confession of Jesus as the Messiah, and Paul on January 25, for his conversion, but they are commemorated together on June 29 in observance of the tradition of the Church that they both died as martyrs in Rome during the persecution under Nero, in 64.

Paul, the well-educated and cosmopolitan Jew of the Dispersion, and Peter, the uneducated fisherman from Galilee, had differences of opinion in the early years of the Church concerning the mission to the Gentiles. More than once, Paul speaks of rebuking Peter for his continued insistence on Jewish exclusiveness; yet their common commitment to Christ and the proclamation of the Gospel proved stronger than their differences; and both eventually carried that mission to Rome, where they were martyred. According to tradition, Paul was granted the right of a Roman citizen to be beheaded by a sword, but Peter suffered the fate of his Lord, crucifixion, though with head downward.

A generation after their martyrdom, Clement of Rome, writing to the Church in Corinth, probably in 96 A.D., says: “Let us come to those who have most recently proved champions; let us take up the noble examples of our own generation. Because of jealousy and envy the greatest and most upright pillars of the Church were persecuted and competed unto death. Let us bring before our eyes the good apostles—Peter, who because of unrighteous jealousy endured not one or two, but numerous trials, and so bore a martyr’s witness and went to the glorious place that he deserved. Because of jealousy and strife Paul pointed the way to the reward of endurance; seven times he was imprisoned, he was exiled, he was stoned, he was a preacher in both east and west, and won renown for his faith, teaching uprightness to the whole world, and reaching the farthest limit of the west, and bearing a martyr’s witness before the rulers, he passed out of the world and was taken up into the holy place, having proved a very great example of endurance.”

 

Let us pray. Almighty God, whose blessed apostles Peter and Paul glorified you by their martyrdom: Grant that your Church, instructed by their teaching and example, and knit together in unity by your Spirit, may ever stand firm upon the one foundation, which is Jesus Christ our Lord; who lives and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

 

July 4 ~ Independence Day

Proper Psalms, Lessons, and Prayers were first appointed for this national observance in the Proposed Prayer Book of 1786. They were deleted, however, by the General Convention of 1789, primarily as a result of the intervention of Bishop William White. Though himself a supporter of the American Revolution, he felt that the required observance was inappropriate, since the majority of the Church’s clergy had, in fact, been loyal to the British crown.

Writing about the Convention which had called for the observance of the day throughout “this Church, on the fourth of July, for ever,” White said, “The members of the convention seem to have thought themselves so established in their station of ecclesiastical legislators, that they might expect of the many clergy who had been averse to the American revolution the adoption of this service; although, by the use of it, they must make an implied acknowledgment of their error, in an address to Almighty God. . . . The greater stress is laid on this matter because of the notorious fact, that the majority of the clergy could not have used the service, without subjecting themselves to ridicule and censure. For the author’s part, having no hindrance of this sort, he contented himself with having opposed the measure, and kept the day from respect to the requisition of the convention; but could never hear of its being kept, in above two or three places beside Philadelphia.”

It was not until the revision of 1928 that provision was again made for the liturgical observance of the day.

Let us pray. Lord God Almighty, in whose Name the founders of this country won liberty for themselves and for us, and lit the torch of freedom for nations then unborn: Grant, we beseech thee, that we and all the people of this land may have grace to maintain these liberties in righteousness and peace; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

 

Please pray for...

For our Church and Clergy: ‡Justin, Archbishop of Canterbury; ‡Katharine, Presiding Bishop; +Barry, our Bishop; Fr. Leo+, our Parish Priest; Bryan, our Deacon; the clergy & people of the Diocese of Northern California; and Christians in the Holy Land and Middle East.

For all in need, especially: Fr. Leo+, Deacon Bryan, Rev. Blake+ Leighton, AnneBarquist, June Salter, Ron Eileen Martin, Norah & Jerry Collins, Michael Clore, JaneDuffty, Clementine Hall, Chrystina Harris, Jeff Norton.

 (To add to the prayer list, contact Leila: 263-4565 or ldh1218@sbcglobal.net)

 

Announcements

If you would like to host the Hospitality Hour after Sunday Service please sign the  Hospitality Hour Schedule in Carey Hall.

Please bring offerings of nonperishable foods for the Food Pantry. As we continue our outreach to the needy in our community, your donations are always appreciated and needed to sustain this vital service.  Also, your monetary donations are always appreciated and needed to sustain this vital service. Your dollar buys much more food when we purchase in bulk. 

 Thank you.

Opportunity to serve St. John’s: If you’re friendly and frequent thrift stores, perhaps you’re just the person to volunteer in the thrift Shop.  Volunteers are needed, especially to help sort the overstock.   Even an hour or two would be appreciated. If you’re interested, leave a message for Ginger Ingersol, thrift shop manager, at (707) 245-3147.  The shop is openTuesdayWednesday and Thursday 10 to 4 in the Church basement. 

Until further notice, the Thrift Store is not accepting donations. Volunteers are needed, especially to help sort the overstock; even an hour or two helps.  Please speak to Ginny Ingersoll or Deborah Smith if you can help.

The Food Pantry needs nonperishable foods.                                                                                                                                                               

You can reach Fr. Leo at 349-6563 or e-mail frleo@yahoo.com

 

“Focus on the mission; stay together; 

keep moving forward,in the Name of Christ.”  

(Bishop Barry Beisner)




June 20, 2014, 11:54 PM

June 20, 2014

me
 
 
 
 

The St. John's Herald

The voice of the Episcopal Church in Lake County

St. John's Church

(Episcopal)

1190 North Forbes Street, Lakeport, California 95453

 

You can reach Fr. Leo at 349-6563 or e-mail frleo@yahoo.com

2014 Vestry: 

Susanne La Faver, Senior Warden, susanne.lafaver@att.net;

Lyle La Faver, Junior Warden, llafaver@att.net

Nancy Carter, nancyccarter@yahoo.com

Alethea Eason, aletheason@gmail.com

Leila Haddah, ldh1218@sbcglobal.net

 Nancy Williams, nancyawilliamscnm@gmail.com.

 

St. John’s Church vision statement:

We are a visible, welcoming family of Christ, 

resolved to deepen our relationship with God.

 

June 20, 2014

Dear Folks,

 First of all, much thanks to Mike Salter and his crew for getting the dry grass cut down around The Hermitage this past Wednesday. God bless you! I am still full of joy and thanksgiving for the Baptism of long time parishioner, Stacey Hawkins’ grandson, Jacob Kaden Shaler Crume. Jacob, who is almost seven years old,  and he was able to read all his Baptismal vows from the Book of Common Prayer on his own and not have his godparents speak for him! Ad that after he and his family arriving in Lake County late  Saturday night from Springfield, MO. It was a grace filled event for all, especially for me at this stage of my ministry.

The week following did have one of those modern day annoyances- getting one’s e-mail hacked and messages going out to my address list saying that I was stranded in Nigeria and needed $2,400 to get home, and another message saying I was in The Philippines and you could get me back for a bargain price of $1,200. (If it was claimed that I was being held in Paris until my pastry bill was paid, it might be more believable.) I seriously doubt if anyone still falls for this fraud, but if you are still overwhelmed with fright for my well-being, you may bring either the $2,400 or the bargain price of $1,200 directly to me in cash. Do not breathe a word of this to the bishop or he might be expecting a cut. The real nuisance is that my e-mail account is now not able to receive incoming messages, so please contact me using St. John’s e-mail account (stjohnslakeport@gmail.com) and put “att. Fr. Leo” in the subject space. If you know of someone who has the necessary expertise to get my account straightened out, please give me a call.    

This Sunday we will celebrate our Patronal Feast Day of the Nativity od  St. John the Baptist; and the following Sunday we will wind up June with the Bishop Barry’s biannual visitation and June 29th

And yes, I plan take the first Sunday of July off to rest and recuperate. Maybe, if I’m up to it, I will be able to get taken over to the Coast for the 4th of July weekend.

All in all, I’ve been holding up pretty well through all this, but I am planing to reduce my work load at the end of June by only putting out The Herald once a month for July, August, and September. So when you do not receive your weekly Herald after June, don’t panic!    

    Please continue to keep me in your prayers and love as I  keep going, for as long as it is God’s Will, to serve you as your parish priest.      

    God love you,

Fr. Leo+

 

Organ Music for Sunday, June 22nd

Prelude: Spread, Oh Spread  arranged by P. Bouman, Minnesota 1900's

Offertory: The God of Abraham arranged by A. Raison, France 1600's

Postlude:Toccata in E minor by J. Pachelbel, Germany 1600's

Mel Taylor, Parish Organist

 

Special Announcement

Office of the Bishop

 

Dear Friends,

It is with a mixture of joy and sadness that I let you know that I am in transition. My husband, the Rev. Bryon Hansen has been called as Senior Pastor for Phinney Ridge Lutheran Church (ELCA) in Seattle, Washington. I will be leaving my position as Canon to the Ordinary as of October 1, 2014.

  It has been an honor and a privilege to serve this diocese and Bishop Beisner for the past 7 ? years. During that time, there have been many changes and developments that have been exciting and hopeful. I believe that we are in a healthy place and are well-positioned to meet the opportunities and challenges of the future.

My professional future is, as yet, unclear. This will be a period of discernment for me and the first time in my life that I haven't known exactly what my next job will be before I have completed my current one!

Over the next 3 ? months, I hope to have the opportunity to say "goodbye" to you. I am aware that a good "leave-taking" is the best preparation for what will come next. When the new Canon to the Ordinary arrives, the bishop intends for there to be some overlap. I know that you will welcome that person and share with them our common mission to "make disciples, raise up saints, and transform communities for Christ."

There will be much more to say and share over the next few months. There will be a variety of venues for this. Please feel free to contact me to ensure that we have time to make a happy ending together. 

   

With faith, hope and love,

Canon Britt

 

From our Senior Warden...

June Vestry meeting is Sunday, June 22.

St. John’s vestry meets after social hour the third Sunday of each month to review and discuss church business, including expenses and building maintenance.

This month, our meeting day is rescheduled to June 22 due to Father’s Day falling on June 15. All interested parishioners are encouraged to attend.

We are pleased to welcome Mary Terou, St. John’s new bookkeeper, who is doing a fine job since beginning in May. Expect regular reports on St. John’s finances, at least quarterly.

If you have any questions, comments, or an agenda item to recommend, please contact one of us.

The 2014 elected vestry members are Nancy Carter, nancyccarter@yahoo.com; Alethea Eason,aletheason@gmail.com; Leila Haddah, ldh1218@sbcglobal.net; Lyle La Faver, llafaver@att.net; Susanne La Faver, susanne.lafaver@att.net; and Nancy Williams,nancyawilliamscnm@gmail.com.

 The new vinyl directional banner for the Basement Boutique Thrift Store has been installed on the Clearlake Ave. side of the church. In the meantime, watch for a refurbished church sign on the front lawn.

Finally, we give thanks for the direction and ministry of our beloved Fr. Leo. Praise God for his continued energy and life!

Susanne La Faver

Senior Warden

 

 

THE BISHOP IS COMING, THE BISHOP IS COMING!!!

On Sunday, June 29th, The Right Reverend Barry L. Beisner, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Northern California, will make his official parochial visitation to St. John’s, Lakeport. This is one of the most important events in the life of a parish in The Episcopal Church, connecting the local congregation to the area diocese, the national church, and ultimately the worldwide Anglican Communion.

When the bishop is with us he will preside at the celebration of Holy Eucharist, preach, and if there are any candidates, administer Confirmation and formally receive into The Episcopal Church those who come from other church traditions. His visit also offers all of us an opportunity to reaffirm our commitment to The Episcopal Church by renewing our Baptismal Vows. Afterwards Bishop Barry will wish to meet and speak with Vestry members and those present at the Hospitality Hour.

If you are presently worshiping at St. John’s and would like to formalize your affiliation with the parish and The Episcopal Church in either of the ways described above, please let Fr. Leo know so that the necessary arrangements can be made in advance. 

The most important thing you can do is to make firm plans to be present at St. John’s onJune 29th to welcome the bishop and receive the blessings of his visit. I’ll be there also! 

Fr. Leo+

 

 

Urgent prayer, help needed for Iraq’s Christians

By ACNS staff | June 16, 2014 

[Anglican Communion News Service] 

In the wake of the growing crisis in Iraq, a plea for prayer and help has been issued by the Diocese of Cyprus and the Gulf and the Anglican vicar of St. George’s Church in Baghdad.

An estimated half a million people, including hundreds of Christian families, are fleeing the area with many attempting to find refuge in the nearby Kurdish provinces of Northern Iraq. At least one Assyrian church in Mosul has been burned down in the recent violence.

A statement from the diocese said that Christians are feeling particularly vulnerable, “especially in light of the treatment of Christians in the Raqqah province of northern Syria where ISIS* has also established its authority.

“Recall that, in February 2014, ISIS commanders in Raqqah forced Christian community leaders to sign a contract agreeing to a set of stringent conditions. These included the payment of a special tax (known as jizya), conduct of Christian rites only behind closed doors so as to be neither visible nor audible to Muslims, and adherence to Islamic commercial, dress code and dietary regulations.

“Mosul and the surrounding Nineveh plain is the traditional heartland of Iraq’s Christian communities. Many Christians fled to this region when forced to leave Baghdad and other areas in recent years. Christians are alarmed at the ISIS take-over of Mosul, fearful that this will further accelerate the decline of the Christian presence in Iraq.”

The statement said Christians in the country have asked for prayer for the following issues:

The Christians of Mosul will know the close presence of Jesus, the guidance of the Spirit and the protection of the Father

Those who have chosen to remain in the city would not be subjected to violent or unjust treatment

Humanitarian assistance would reach all who are in need, whether having been displaced or remaining in Mosul

Christians throughout Iraq will know the peace and presence of Jesus each day, and will remain faithful to him and clear in their testimony

The Iraqi authorities will act decisively to improve security for all citizens of Iraq.

Anglican vicar of St. George’s Church in Baghdad, Canon Andrew White, also issued an appeal entitled “Please, please help us in this crisis”. Canon White who has lost hundreds of his congregation to the violence over the years, said Iraq was facing its worst crisis since 2003. 

“ISIS, a group that does not even see Al Qaida as extreme enough, has moved into Mosul, which is Nineveh. It has totally taken control, destroyed all government departments. Allowed all prisoners out of the prisons. Killed countless numbers of people. There are bodies over the streets. The army and police have fled, so many of the military resources have been captured. Tankers, armed vehicles and even helicopters are now in the hands of ISIS.”

Writing on the Foundation for Relief and Reconciliation in the Middle East, Canon Andrew said his work at St. George’s–providing a spiritual home, medical care and humanitarian relief as well as promoting reconciliation amongst different religious groups–is inevitably suffering.

“The summer is by far our worst time of the year for support,” he writes. “Both our Foundation in the UK and US have seriously had to reduce our funding. We are in a desperate crisis. So many of our people had returned their homes in Nineveh for the summer now they are stuck in this total carnage unable to even escape. We desperately need help so that we can help the Christians of this broken land just get through this new crisis. Please can you help us, we are desperate.

The terrible fact is that ISIS are in the control now of Fallujah in the South and Mosul in the North they could now move down towards Baghdad between the two and cause a total crisis there. So to be honest I don’t know what to do, do I stay or go back? I have a huge amount of commitments here. If I go back, I cannot change the situation but I want to be with my people. Here we are with this huge crisis and need and we do not even have the resources to help those most in need.”

For more information on supporting Canon White’s ministry visit http://frrme.org/please-please-help-us-crisis/

*the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria Group

 

Archbishop of Canterbury meets Pope Francis in Rome

June 16, 2014 [Lambeth Palace] 

In their second meeting within eighteen months Pope Francis and Archbishop Justin Welby today recommitted themselves resolutely to the struggle against modern slavery and human trafficking.

Following their first meeting last year the two global leaders have continually spoken out to challenge this crime against humanity, and have acted decisively to support the foundation of the new faith based global freedom network. They both endorsed this network as a crucial force in the struggle to rid the world of a global evil.

Pope Francis and Archbishop Justin also spoke about areas in conflict and how churches around the globe are called by Christ, our reconciler, to act as peacemakers. They described their Christian passion for peacemaking in places torn apart by war, and pledged their ongoing commitment to act as agents of reconciliation and restorative justice.

The Pope and Archbishop also spoke of their appreciation of the recent work of the Anglican Roman  Catholic International Commission (ARCIC) following its meeting in South Africa. The burdens of division continue but the opportunities for new collaboration and much deeper understanding between the two world communions are compelling and timely.

.

Coming up...   

Sunday, June 22nd: Celebration of the Nativity of Saint John the Baptist, our Patronal Feast. 10 am Holy Eucharist, Fr. Leo celebrant and Ron Martin preaching. June Vestry Meeting in the Collier Room.  

Sunday, June 29th: Third Sunday after Pentecost. 10 am Holy Eucharist celebrated by The Rt. Rev. Barry L. Beisner, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Northern California 

Sunday, July 6th, 4th Sunday after Pentecost. 10 am Morning Prayer (Fr. Leo’s Sunday off ).

 

JUNE BIRTHDAYS and ANNIVERSARIES

On June 3rd - Mel Taylor and Susan McCarty, on the 8th - Vicky Maley, on the 9th - JuneSalter, on the 10th - Ginger Ingersoll, on the 13th - Russell Patterson, and on the 18 - BillEason. 

Happy Anniversary on the 25th to Vicky & John Maley! 

 

 

 

THE FEAST OF ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST

St. John's Day in June (i.e., the Nativity of Saint John the Baptist on June 24th), falls quite near to the summer solstice. Several customs relating to the remembrance of the Forerunner, such as St. John's Bonfire, give Christian meaning to older customs. The bonfire which the ancients lit to celebrate the high point of the sun in the annual solar cycle, became for Christians a reminder of the saint who points us to the one who was to come to "give light to them that sit in darkness." The August feast which celebrates his "decollation" (a marvelously polite way to describe the rather gruesome reality of the sudden separation of his head from his shoulders) does not have a lot of customs of its own. (excerpted from Full Homely Divinity web site.)

This Saint was highly honored throughout the whole Church from the beginning. Proof of this is, among other things, the fact that fifteen churches were dedicated to him in the ancient imperial city of Constantinople. Being the precursor of our Lord, he was accorded the same honor as the first great saints of the Christian era, although he belonged to the Old Covenant. The fact that Christ praised him so highly (Matt. 11, 11) encouraged, of course, a special veneration. Accordingly, we find a regular cycle of feasts in his honor among the early Christian churches...

...Accordingly, the Church celebrates his natural birth by a festival of his "nativity," assigned exactly six months before the Nativity of Christ, since John was six months older than the Lord. As soon as the feast of Christmas was established on December 25 (in the fifth century) the date of the Baptist's birth was assigned to June 24...

...The Council of Agde, in 506, listed the Nativity of Saint John among the highest feasts of the year, a day on which all faithful had to attend Mass and abstain from servile work.  Indeed, so great was the rank of this festival that, just as on Christmas, three Masses were celebrated, one during the vigil service, the second at dawn, the third in the morning. In 1022, a synod at Seligenstadt, Germany, prescribed a fourteen-day fast and abstinence in preparation for the Feast of the Baptist. This, however, was never accepted into universal practice by the Roman authorities...

...The Baptist is patron of tailors (because he made his own garments in the desert), of shepherds (because he spoke of the "Lamb of God"), and of masons (including the Freemasons, who celebrate his day as one of their great annual feasts). This patronage over masons is traced to his words:

Make ready the way of the Lord, make straight all his paths. Every valley shall be filled, and every mountain and hill shall be brought low, And the crooked shall be made straight, and the rough ways smooth. (Luke 3, 4-6.)

All over Europe, from Scandinavia to Spain, and from Ireland to Russia, Saint John's Day festivities are closely associated with the ancient nature lore of the great summer festival of pre-Christian times. Fires are lighted on mountains and hilltops on the eve of his feast. These "Saint John's fires" burn brightly and quietly along the fiords of Norway, on the peaks of the Alps, on the slopes of the Pyrenees, and on the mountains of Spain (where they are called Hogsueras). They were an ancient symbol of the warmth and light of the sun which the forefathers greeted at the beginning of summer. In many places, great celebrations are held with dances, games, and outdoor meals.

Fishermen from Brittany keep this custom even while far out at sea in the Arctic Ocean. They hoist a barrel filled with castoff clothing to the tip of the mainsail yard and set the contents on fire. All ships of the fishing fleet light up at the same time, about eight o'clock in the evening. The men gather around the mast, pray and sing. Afterward they celebrate in their quarters, and the captain gives each crew member double pay.

Another custom is that of lighting many small fires in the valleys and plains. People gather around, jump through the flames, and sing traditional songs in praise of the Saint or of summer. This custom is based on the pre-Christian "need fires" (niedfyr, nodfyr) which were believed to cleanse, cure, and immunize people from all kinds of disease, curses, and dangers. In Spain these smaller fires (fogatas) are lighted in the streets of towns and cities, everybody contributing some old furniture or other wood, while children jump over the flames. In Brest, France, the bonfires are replaced by lighted torches which people throw in the air. In other districts of France they cover wagon wheels with straw, then set them on fire with a blessed candle and roll them down the hill slopes.

As the first day of summer, Saint John's Day is considered in ancient folklore one of the great "charmed" festivals of the year. Hidden treasures are said to lie open in lonely places, waiting for the lucky finder. Divining rods should be cut on this day. Herbs are given unusual powers of healing which they retain if they are plucked during the night of the feast. In Germany they call these herbs Johanneskraut (St. John's herbs), and people bring them to church for a special blessing.

In Scandinavia and in the Slavic countries it is an ancient superstition that on Saint John's Day witches and demons are allowed to roam the earth. As at Halloween, children go the rounds and demand "treats," straw figures are thrown into the flames, and much noise is made to drive the demons away.

It should be noted, however, that in the Catholic sections of Europe the combination of the ancient festival of nature lore with the Feast of the Baptist has resulted in a tradition of dignified celebration, which has come down to our day. People gather around the fireplace, dressed in their national or local costumes, and sing their beautiful ancient songs. When the fire is lighted, one of them recites a poem that expresses the thought of the feast. Then they pray together to Saint John for his intercession that the summer may be blessed in homes, fields, and country, and finally perform some of the traditional folk dances, usually accompanied by singing and music. 

(Source: Holyday Book, The by Francis X. Weiser, S.J., Harcourt, Brace and Company, Inc., New York, 1956)

Since St. John the Baptist is the name sake of our parish, his feast day is our titular and patronal feast. It has been our custom for many years now to celebrate that occasion on theSunday closest to June 24th, the actual date of his feast. this year we will observe our Patronal Feast on Sunday, June 22nd with the hymns, prayers and Scripture Readings at our SundayEucharist appropriate to the Nativity of St. John the Baptist.  Given the high fire dangers caused by three years of drought, I do not recommend that we go out and start any bonfires in Lakeport!   

 

Healing Service at St. John’s

St. John's has reinstated a new healing service the first Sunday of each month after the regular morning service. Every quarter we will do a Public Healing Service before Holy Eucharist. We are all ministers of Christ's love and any member of the St. John's family is invited to lead either the regular service or the quarterly one. Both services are taken from The Episcopal Church’s The Book of Occasional Services and easy to follow. You are welcome to do this only once, if that is your preference, and no long term commitment need be made. If you feel called to perform this ministry, please speak to Alethea Eason or contact her at 355-0553 oraletheaeason@gmail.com

       

Prayer for the Kidnapped Nigerian Girls 

May 2014

O God, we cry out to you

for the lives and the freedom

of the 276 kidnapped girls in Nigeria.

In their time of danger and fear,

pour out your strong Spirit for them.  

Make a way home for them in safety. 

Make a way back for them

to the education that will lift them up. 

Hold them in the knowledge 

that they are not captive slaves, 

they are not purchased brides,

but they are your beloved daughters,

and precious in your sight.  

Change the hearts and minds of their kidnappers

and of all who choose violence against women and girls.

Cast down the mighty from their seat,

and lift up the humble and meek,

through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Written by Elizabeth Smith, Diocese of Perth, Australia

 

 

Your Favorite Hymns

We're conducting a survey to learn your favorite hymns, so that we can sing them more often on Sunday morning.  The form is in the program each Sunday morning to fill out and submit.  Or send an e-mail to Leila at ldh1218@sbcglobal.net or to Anne at k9hobbyhome@gmail.com with your favorites, no limit.  We need only the Hymn number and first line.

 

Prayer List

The Prayer List was edited last week.  If we have removed someone still in need of our prayers or if you have anyone else to add, please contact Leila at ldh1218@sbcglobal.net or (707) 263-4565.

 

A New Parish Directory is in the Works   

Arden Hyatt has agreed to create a new St. John’s parish roster, once she gets everybody’s updated information. Please double-check your addresses, e-mails and phone numbers in the sample roster on the narthex table at the rear of the church. We want to stay in touch with all of you! And, thank you, Arden for your valuable roster ministry!

Suzanne LaFaver 

  

 

 

ALTAR GUILD

The Altar Guild is looking for new members, if this is a ministry you would like to be a part of or if you would like more information please contact Barbara Knight, or another Altar Guild member.

 

 

From Lesser Feasts and Fasts...

June 22 ~ Alban, First Martyr of Britain, c. 304

Alban is the earliest Christian in Britain who is known by name and, according to tradition, the first British martyr. He was a soldier in the Roman army stationed at Verulamium, a city about twenty miles northeast of London, now called St. Alban’s. He gave shelter to a Christian priest who was fleeing from persecution, and was converted by him. When officers came to Alban’s house, he dressed himself in the garments of the priest and gave himself up. Alban was tortured and martyred in place of the priest, on the hilltop where the Cathedral of St. Alban’s now stands. The traditional date of his martyrdom is 303 or 304, but recent studies suggest that the year was actually 209, during the persecution under the Emperor Septimius Severus.

The site of Alban’s martyrdom soon became a shrine. King Offa of Mercia established a monastery, there about the year 793, and in the high Middle Ages St. Alban’s ranked as the premier Abbey in England. The great Norman abbey church, begun in 1077, now serves as the cathedral of the diocese of St. Alban’s, established in 1877. It is the second longest church in England (Winchester Cathedral is the longest, by six feet), and it is built on higher ground than any other English cathedral. In a chapel east of the choir and high Altar, there are remains of the fourteenth century marble shrine of St. Alban.

The Venerable Bede gives this account of Alban’s trial: “When Alban was brought in, the judge happened to be standing before an altar, offering sacrifice to devils . . . ‘What is your family and race?’ demanded the judge. ‘How does my family concern you?’ replied Alban; ‘If you wish to know the truth about my religion, know that I am a Christian and am ready to do a Christian’s duty.’ ‘I demand to know your name,’ insisted the judge. ‘Tell me at once.’ ‘My parents named me Alban,’ he answered, ‘and I worship and adore the living and true God, who created all things.’ ”

Let us pray. Almighty God, by whose grace and power thy holy martyr Alban triumphed over suffering and was faithful even unto death: Grant to us, who now remember him with thanksgiving, to be so faithful in our witness to thee in this world, that we may receive with him the crown of life; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

 

June 24 ~ The Nativity of Saint John the Baptist

John the Baptist, the prophet, and forerunner of Jesus, was the son of elderly parents, Elizabeth and Zechariah, and was related to Jesus on his mother’s side. His birth is celebrated six months before Christmas Day, since, according to Luke, Elizabeth became pregnant six months before the Angel Gabriel appeared to Mary.

John figures prominently in all four Gospels, but the account of his birth is given only in the Gospel according to Luke. His father, Zechariah, a priest of the Temple at Jerusalem, was struck speechless because he doubted a vision foretelling John’s birth. When his speech was restored, Zechariah uttered a canticle of praise, the Benedictus, which is one of the canticles in the Daily Office.

John lived ascetically in the desert. He was clothed with camel’s hair, with a leather belt, and ate locusts and wild honey. He preached repentance, and called upon people to prepare for the coming of the Kingdom and of the Messiah, baptizing his followers to signify their repentance and new life. Jesus himself was baptized by John in the Jordan.

John had many followers, some of whom became Jesus’ disciples. Because of his denunciation of the sins of Herod, especially Herod’s incestuous marriage, John incurred the enmity of Herodias, Herod’s wife, and was put in prison. Through Herodias’ plotting with Salome, her daughter, Herod was led to promise a gift to Salome, who demanded John’s head. John was thereupon executed.

John is remembered during Advent as a prophet, and at Epiphany as the baptizer of Jesus. The Gospel according to John quotes the Baptist as saying to his followers that Jesus is the Lamb of God, and prophesying, “He must increase, but I must decrease” (John 3:30).

Let us pray. Almighty God, by whose providence your servant John the Baptist was wonderfully born, and sent to prepare the way of your Son our Savior by preaching repentance: Make us so to follow his teaching and holy life, that we may truly repent according to his preaching; and, following his example, constantly speak the truth, boldly rebuke vice, and patiently suffer for the truth’s sake; through Jesus Christ your Son our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

 

June 28 ~ Irenaeus, Bishop of Lyons, c. 202

If theology is “thinking about faith” and arranging those thoughts in some systematic order, then Irenaeus has been rightly recognized by Catholics and Protestants alike as the first great systematic theologian.

There is considerable doubt about the year of Irenaeus’ birth; estimates vary from 97 to 160. It is certain that he learned the Christian faith in Ephesus at the feet of the venerable Polycarp, who in turn had known John the Evangelist. Some years before 177, probably while Irenaeus was still in his teens, he carried the tradition of Christianity to Lyons in southern France.

His name means “the peaceable one”—and suitably so. The year 177 brought hardship to the mission in Gaul. Persecution broke out, and a mounting tide of heresy threatened to engulf the Church. Irenaeus, by now a presbyter, was sent to Rome to mediate the dispute regarding Montanism, which the Bishop of Rome, Eleutherus, seemed to embrace. While Irenaeus was on this mission, the aged Bishop of Lyons, Pothinus, died in prison during a local persecution. When Irenaeus returned to Lyons, he was elected bishop to succeed Pothinus.

Irenaeus’ enduring fame rests mainly on a large treatise, entitled The Refutation and Overthrow of Gnosis, Falsely So-Called, usually shortened to Against Heresies. In it, lrenaeus describes the major Gnostic systems, thoroughly, clearly, and often with biting humor. It is one of our chief sources of knowledge about Gnosticism. He also makes a case for Christianity which has become a classic, resting heavily on Scripture, and on the continuity between the teaching of the Apostles and the teaching of bishops, generation after generation, especially in the great see cities. Against the Gnostics, who despised the flesh and exalted the spirit, he stressed two doctrines: that of the creation as good, and that of the resurrection of the body.

A late and uncertain tradition claims that he suffered martyrdom, about 202.

Let us pray. Almighty God, who didst uphold thy servant Irenaeus with strength to maintain the truth against every blast of vain doctrine: Keep us, we beseech thee, steadfast in thy true religion, that in constancy and peace we may walk in the way that leadeth to eternal life; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

 

Please pray for...

For our Church and Clergy: ‡Justin, Archbishop of Canterbury; ‡Katharine, Presiding Bishop; +Barry, our Bishop; Fr. Leo+, our Parish Priest; Bryan, our Deacon; the clergy & people of the Diocese of Northern California; and Christians in the Holy Land and Middle East.

For all in need, especially: Fr. Leo+, Deacon Bryan, Rev. Blake+ Leighton, AnneBarquist, June Salter, Ron Eileen Martin, Norah & Jerry Collins, Michael Clore, JaneDuffty, Clementine Hall, Chrystina Harris, Jeff Norton.

 (To add to the prayer list, contact Leila: 263-4565 or ldh1218@sbcglobal.net)

 

Announcements

If you would like to host the Hospitality Hour after Sunday Service please sign the  Hospitality Hour Schedule in Carey Hall.

Please bring offerings of nonperishable foods for the Food Pantry. As we continue our outreach to the needy in our community, your donations are always appreciated and needed to sustain this vital service.  Also, your monetary donations are always appreciated and needed to sustain this vital service. Your dollar buys much more food when we purchase in bulk. 

 Thank you.

Opportunity to serve St. John’s: If you’re friendly and frequent thrift stores, perhaps you’re just the person to volunteer in the thrift Shop.  Volunteers are needed, especially to help sort the overstock.   Even an hour or two would be appreciated. If you’re interested, leave a message for Ginger Ingersol, thrift shop manager, at (707) 245-3147.  The shop is openTuesdayWednesday and Thursday 10 to 4 in the Church basement. 

Until further notice, the Thrift Store is not accepting donations. Volunteers are needed, especially to help sort the overstock; even an hour or two helps.  Please speak to Ginny Ingersoll or Deborah Smith if you can help.

The Food Pantry needs nonperishable foods.                                                                                                                                                               

You can reach Fr. Leo at 349-6563 or e-mail frleo@yahoo.com

 

“Focus on the mission; stay together; 

keep moving forward,in the Name of Christ.”  

(Bishop Barry Beisner)




June 13, 2014, 10:11 PM

June 13, 2014

The St. John's Herald

The voice of the Episcopal Church in Lake County

St. John's Church

(Episcopal)

1190 North Forbes Street, Lakeport, California 95453

 

You can reach Fr. Leo at 349-6563 or e-mail frleo@yahoo.com

2014 Vestry: 

Susanne La Faver, Senior Warden, susanne.lafaver@att.net;

Lyle La Faver, Junior Warden, llafaver@att.net

Nancy Carter, nancyccarter@yahoo.com

Alethea Eason, aletheason@gmail.com

Leila Haddah, ldh1218@sbcglobal.net

 Nancy Williams, nancyawilliamscnm@gmail.com.

 

St. John’s Church vision statement:

We are a visible, welcoming family of Christ, 

resolved to deepen our relationship with God.

 

June 13, 2014

Dear Folks,

June is almost half over and we still have several joyous celebrations through the rest of the month. This Sunday we will mark three special events: the Feast of the Holy Trinity, Fathers Day, and most special of all, the Baptism of long time parishioner, Stacey Hawkins’ grandson, Jacob Kaden Shaler Crume. Jacob, who is almost seven years old, and his family do not live in this area and will only be arriving in Lake County on Saturday evening, so the preparation was done in their home parish, and we will have a brief rehearsal early Sunday morning. As a parish priest, administering Holy Baptism is one of the most joyous occasions that I get called upon to do. I hope you all will be at Church to support Jacob and his family and celebrate with them. We will conclude the liturgy with prayers and a special blessing to all our fathers, living and departed.

Then we will celebrate our Patronal Feast Day on the following Sunday and wind up June with the Bishop Barry’s biannual visitation on June 29th

And yes, I will take the first Sunday of July off to rest and recuperate. Maybe, if I’m up to it, I will be able to get taken over to the Coast to visit folks over at St. Michael’s in Fort Bragg where I served for two years as Interim Priest.

All in all, I’ve been holding up pretty well since my downturn in May, but I never seem to get back to the level of strength and stamina as I had previously. But I’m not complaining, it’s a miracle that I’m still here at all after 3 1/2 years living with terminal cancer! I wrote last week, I am planing to reduce my work load at the end of this month by only putting out The Herald once a month for July, August, and September and then see how things are going after that. So when you do not receive your weekly Herald after June, don’t panic!    

    Please continue to keep me in your prayers and love as I  keep going, for as long as it is God’s Will, to serve you as your parish priest.      

    God love you,

Fr. Leo+

 

Organ Music for Sunday, June 15th

Prelude  All Glory Be To God  by J.Pachelbel, Germany 1600's

Offertory  Holy, Holy, Holy arranged by T. Canning, 

Eastmann 1900's

Postlude Toccata in G  by W. Pachelbel, Germany 1600's

Mel Taylor, Parish Organist

 

Special Diocesan Seasonal Message

A Pentecost Message from the Bishop

 

Dear Friends in Christ:

Grace and peace to you as we enter a new Season of the Church year and of our journey together.

The Season of Easter now ends, but the work of bearing witness to Christ's Resurrection continues. Jesus sends us, as He was sent, to continue His work of reconciliation in the world. We are partners with God in God's mission.

Pentecost comes to remind us of this truth about ourselves and our true work. The Holy Spirit empowers each of us to do that work, and all of us to do it together. The gift of the Spirit creates the Church, a community of people living ever-deepening relationships of love and trust with Christ, and with each other. May God help us in this holy Season to be more faithfully attentive to those relationships and to that work.

I pray that God will bless you this Pentecost, and that together we will more truly be the Church that God calls us to be.

  Yours in the power of the Spirit,

+Barry

  

HAPPY FATHERS DAY to all our Fathers, and to all who have served in a fatherly role in our lives. We also remember and give thanks to God our heavenly Father for all our fathers who have departed this life. May they rest in peace.

 

Coming up...    

Sunday, June 15th: Feast of the Holy Trinity and Fathers Day. 10 am Holy Eucharist including the Baptism of Jacob Kaden Shaler Crume, grandson of Stacey Hawkins.

Sunday, June 22nd: Celebration of the Nativity of Saint John the Baptist, our Patronal Feast. 10 am Holy Eucharist, Fr. Leo celebrant and Ron Martin preaching. June Vestry Meeting in the Collier Room.  

Sunday, June 29th: Third Sunday after Pentecost. 10 am Holy Eucharist celebrated by The Rt. Rev. Barry L. Beisner, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Northern California 

Sunday, July 6th, 4th Sunday after Pentecost. 10 am Morning Prayer (Fr. Leo’s Sunday off ).

 

JUNE BIRTHDAYS and ANNIVERSARIES

On June 3rd - Mel Taylor and Susan McCarty, on the 8th - Vicky Maley, on the 9th - JuneSalter, on the 10th - Ginger Ingersoll, on the 13th - Russell Patterson, and on the 18 - BillEason. 

Happy Anniversary on the 25th to Vicky & John Maley! 

 

THE BISHOP IS COMING, THE BISHOP IS COMING!!!

On Sunday, June 29th, The Right Reverend Barry L. Beisner, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Northern California, will make his official parochial visitation to St. John’s, Lakeport. This is one of the most important events in the life of a parish in The Episcopal Church, connecting the local congregation to the area diocese, the national church, and ultimately the worldwide Anglican Communion.

When the bishop is with us he will preside at the celebration of Holy Eucharist, preach, and if there are any candidates, administer Confirmation and formally receive into The Episcopal Church those who come from other church traditions. His visit also offers all of us an opportunity to reaffirm our commitment to The Episcopal Church by renewing our Baptismal Vows. Afterwards Bishop Barry will wish to meet and speak with Vestry members and those present at the Hospitality Hour.

If you are presently worshiping at St. John’s and would like to formalize your affiliation with the parish and The Episcopal Church in either of the ways described above, please let Fr. Leo know so that the necessary arrangements can be made in advance. 

The most important thing you can do is to make firm plans to be present at St. John’s onJune 29th to welcome the bishop and receive the blessings of his visit. I’ll be there also!

 

 

LISTEN TO THE CONGREGATION IN THAT LITTLE RED CHURCH------

THEY CAN REALLY SING JOYOUSLY

What fun it is to sing a song that you know and love to hear.  Our 1982 Hymnal is full of lovely songs and luckily we have a very nice organ and an excellent organist who enjoys supporting us with his accompaniment style.  Some organists play so fast that the singers can't get the words in and some organists make dirges out of all hymns.  Mel Taylor is perfect for us, especially when we are familiar with the melody.  Doesn't it just put a smile on your face when Mel plays the introduction and immediately the words and the melody all come together?  Oh, how I love to sing, and especially at church!

        I remember the first Sunday I visited St. John's Church in March of 2010.  The people were so gracious and the church was lovely--but the music was bleak at best.  And to think of it--now we have an organist, organ, speakers and sound system and a congregation full of happy singers.  Yea for us.  Keep up the sound.  It is very pleasurable .  Lets keep up the good work.  It put smiles on faces.

Written happily by Anne Barquist 

    

From our Senior Warden...

June Vestry meeting is Sunday, June 22.

St. John’s vestry meets after social hour the third Sunday of each month to review and discuss church business, including expenses and building maintenance.

This month, our meeting day is rescheduled to June 22 due to Father’s Day falling on June 15. All interested parishioners are encouraged to attend.

We are pleased to welcome Mary Terou, St. John’s new bookkeeper, who is doing a fine job since beginning in May. Expect regular reports on St. John’s finances, at least quarterly.

If you have any questions, comments, or an agenda item to recommend, please contact one of us.

The 2014 elected vestry members are Nancy Carter, nancyccarter@yahoo.com; Alethea Eason,aletheason@gmail.com; Leila Haddah, ldh1218@sbcglobal.net; Lyle La Faver, llafaver@att.net; Susanne La Faver, susanne.lafaver@att.net; and Nancy Williams,nancyawilliamscnm@gmail.com.

In the meantime, watch for a new vinyl directional banner coming for the Basement Boutique Thrift Store to be located on the Clearlake Ave. side of the church, and a refurbished church sign on the front lawn.

Finally, we give thanks for the direction and ministry of our beloved Fr. Leo. Praise God for his continued energy and life!

Susanne La Faver, Senior Warden

 

Episcopal, ELCA Presiding Bishops Issue Statement on Carbon Emissions (June 6, 2014)

[Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and Presiding Bishop Elizabeth A. Eaton of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) have issued a joint statement in support of the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed Rule on carbon emissions.

“The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and The Episcopal Church are eager to collaborate with the EPA and states across the nation to ensure that the carbon rule is implemented fairly, particularly for low-income consumers,” the Presiding Bishops stated. “We will continue to pray that all involved in this good work will be graced with vision, hope, and the search for truth as they seek to implement the carbon rule swiftly and effectively.”

The joint statement follows:

Joint Statement on the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed Rule on carbon emissions

Lutherans and Episcopalians collectively celebrate and support the release of the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed carbon rule for existing power plants. As faith traditions committed to the health, flourishing, and sanctity of human communities and God’s creation, we believe that the carbon rule is a critical step toward safeguarding the lives and livelihood of future generations.

Recent reports outline the enormous impacts that climate change is already having on our world.  Multi-year droughts, sea level rise, extreme weather events, and increased flooding dramatically affect communities internationally, from the Inupiat on the north slope of Alaska to Midwestern farming families to our brothers and sisters in the Philippines. We recognize with concern that climate change particularly harms low income communities that lack the resources and technology to adapt to rapid environmental changes.

These impacts are already affecting global agriculture, and with it, food supplies and prices. Ending hunger and alleviating global poverty are key concerns for our faith traditions. Yet our work faces the daunting and interconnected challenges of addressing hunger and poverty in a rapidly changing climate.  Sustainable solutions must include both poverty alleviation and environmental conservation.

Power plants are the single largest source of carbon dioxide pollution in the United States and major contributors to climate change. These emissions not only threaten the environmental stability of our planet, but also the health of young children and their families, disproportionally affecting the poorest among us.  Yet there are currently no limits on power plant emissions of greenhouse gases.

The carbon rule proposed this week will reduce the carbon dioxide output from existing power plants, setting a strong standard that will modernize our nation’s power plants while limiting our contribution to global climate change. Reducing carbon emissions from power plants must be a top priority for the U.S. if we hope to prevent the worst impacts of climate change and ensure a just and sustainable world for our generation and those to come.

Our faith traditions teach us that no single person can be whole unless all have the opportunity for full and abundant life. That wholeness and collective well-being is only possible as a global community. We recognize our connections to fellow citizens and neighbors around the world who are already suffering from the consequences of climate change, and acknowledge our responsibility to those yet unborn, who will either benefit from our efforts to curb carbon emissions or suffer from our failure to address this ethical imperative. We believe that addressing climate change is a moral obligation to our neighbors and to God’s creation, so that all may enjoy full, healthy, and abundant lives.

The proposed carbon rule for existing power plants is the single largest step that we can take now to address the pressing issue of climate change. The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and The Episcopal Church are eager to collaborate with the EPA and states across the nation to ensure that the carbon rule is implemented fairly, particularly for low-income consumers.  We will continue to pray that all involved in this good work will be graced with vision, hope, and the search for truth as they seek to implement the carbon rule swiftly and effectively.

The Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts Schori

Presiding Bishop and Primate

The Episcopal Church

The Rev. Elizabeth A. Eaton

Presiding Bishop

Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA)

 

THE FEAST OF ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST

St. John's Day in June (i.e., the Nativity of Saint John the Baptist on June 24th), falls quite near to the summer solstice. Several customs relating to the remembrance of the Forerunner, such as St. John's Bonfire, give Christian meaning to older customs. The bonfire which the ancients lit to celebrate the high point of the sun in the annual solar cycle, became for Christians a reminder of the saint who points us to the one who was to come to "give light to them that sit in darkness." The August feast which celebrates his "decollation" (a marvelously polite way to describe the rather gruesome reality of the sudden separation of his head from his shoulders) does not have a lot of customs of its own. (excerpted from Full Homely Divinity web site.)

This Saint was highly honored throughout the whole Church from the beginning. Proof of this is, among other things, the fact that fifteen churches were dedicated to him in the ancient imperial city of Constantinople. Being the precursor of our Lord, he was accorded the same honor as the first great saints of the Christian era, although he belonged to the Old Covenant. The fact that Christ praised him so highly (Matt. 11, 11) encouraged, of course, a special veneration. Accordingly, we find a regular cycle of feasts in his honor among the early Christian churches...

...Accordingly, the Church celebrates his natural birth by a festival of his "nativity," assigned exactly six months before the Nativity of Christ, since John was six months older than the Lord. As soon as the feast of Christmas was established on December 25 (in the fifth century) the date of the Baptist's birth was assigned to June 24...

...The Council of Agde, in 506, listed the Nativity of Saint John among the highest feasts of the year, a day on which all faithful had to attend Mass and abstain from servile work.  Indeed, so great was the rank of this festival that, just as on Christmas, three Masses were celebrated, one during the vigil service, the second at dawn, the third in the morning. In 1022, a synod at Seligenstadt, Germany, prescribed a fourteen-day fast and abstinence in preparation for the Feast of the Baptist. This, however, was never accepted into universal practice by the Roman authorities...

...The Baptist is patron of tailors (because he made his own garments in the desert), of shepherds (because he spoke of the "Lamb of God"), and of masons (including the Freemasons, who celebrate his day as one of their great annual feasts). This patronage over masons is traced to his words:

Make ready the way of the Lord, make straight all his paths. Every valley shall be filled, and every mountain and hill shall be brought low, And the crooked shall be made straight, and the rough ways smooth. (Luke 3, 4-6.)

All over Europe, from Scandinavia to Spain, and from Ireland to Russia, Saint John's Day festivities are closely associated with the ancient nature lore of the great summer festival of pre-Christian times. Fires are lighted on mountains and hilltops on the eve of his feast. These "Saint John's fires" burn brightly and quietly along the fiords of Norway, on the peaks of the Alps, on the slopes of the Pyrenees, and on the mountains of Spain (where they are called Hogsueras). They were an ancient symbol of the warmth and light of the sun which the forefathers greeted at the beginning of summer. In many places, great celebrations are held with dances, games, and outdoor meals.

Fishermen from Brittany keep this custom even while far out at sea in the Arctic Ocean. They hoist a barrel filled with castoff clothing to the tip of the mainsail yard and set the contents on fire. All ships of the fishing fleet light up at the same time, about eight o'clock in the evening. The men gather around the mast, pray and sing. Afterward they celebrate in their quarters, and the captain gives each crew member double pay.

Another custom is that of lighting many small fires in the valleys and plains. People gather around, jump through the flames, and sing traditional songs in praise of the Saint or of summer. This custom is based on the pre-Christian "need fires" (niedfyr, nodfyr) which were believed to cleanse, cure, and immunize people from all kinds of disease, curses, and dangers. In Spain these smaller fires (fogatas) are lighted in the streets of towns and cities, everybody contributing some old furniture or other wood, while children jump over the flames. In Brest, France, the bonfires are replaced by lighted torches which people throw in the air. In other districts of France they cover wagon wheels with straw, then set them on fire with a blessed candle and roll them down the hill slopes.

As the first day of summer, Saint John's Day is considered in ancient folklore one of the great "charmed" festivals of the year. Hidden treasures are said to lie open in lonely places, waiting for the lucky finder. Divining rods should be cut on this day. Herbs are given unusual powers of healing which they retain if they are plucked during the night of the feast. In Germany they call these herbs Johanneskraut (St. John's herbs), and people bring them to church for a special blessing.

In Scandinavia and in the Slavic countries it is an ancient superstition that on Saint John's Day witches and demons are allowed to roam the earth. As at Halloween, children go the rounds and demand "treats," straw figures are thrown into the flames, and much noise is made to drive the demons away.

It should be noted, however, that in the Catholic sections of Europe the combination of the ancient festival of nature lore with the Feast of the Baptist has resulted in a tradition of dignified celebration, which has come down to our day. People gather around the fireplace, dressed in their national or local costumes, and sing their beautiful ancient songs. When the fire is lighted, one of them recites a poem that expresses the thought of the feast. Then they pray together to Saint John for his intercession that the summer may be blessed in homes, fields, and country, and finally perform some of the traditional folk dances, usually accompanied by singing and music. 

(Source: Holyday Book, The by Francis X. Weiser, S.J., Harcourt, Brace and Company, Inc., New York, 1956)

Since St. John the Baptist is the name sake of our parish, his feast day is our titular and patronal feast. It has been our custom for many years now to celebrate that occasion on theSunday closest to June 24th, the actual date of his feast. This year we will observe our Patronal Feast on Sunday, June 22nd with the hymns, prayers and Scripture Readings at our SundayEucharist appropriate to the Nativity of St. John the Baptist. 

Given the high fire dangers caused by three years of drought, I do not recommend that we go out and start any bonfires in Lakeport!   

 

Healing Service at St. John’s

St. John's has reinstated a new healing service the first Sunday of each month after the regular morning service. Every quarter we will do a Public Healing Service before Holy Eucharist. We are all ministers of Christ's love and any member of the St. John's family is invited to lead either the regular service or the quarterly one. Both services are taken from The Episcopal Church’s The Book of Occasional Services and easy to follow. You are welcome to do this only once, if that is your preference, and no long term commitment need be made. If you feel called to perform this ministry, please speak to Alethea Eason or contact her at 355-0553 oraletheaeason@gmail.com

       

Prayer for the Kidnapped Nigerian Girls 

May 2014

O God, we cry out to you

for the lives and the freedom

of the 276 kidnapped girls in Nigeria.

In their time of danger and fear,

pour out your strong Spirit for them.  

Make a way home for them in safety. 

Make a way back for them

to the education that will lift them up. 

Hold them in the knowledge 

that they are not captive slaves, 

they are not purchased brides,

but they are your beloved daughters,

and precious in your sight.  

Change the hearts and minds of their kidnappers

and of all who choose violence against women and girls.

Cast down the mighty from their seat,

and lift up the humble and meek,

through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Written by Elizabeth Smith, Diocese of Perth, Australia

 

 

Your Favorite Hymns

We're conducting a survey to learn your favorite hymns, so that we can sing them more often on Sunday morning.  The form is in the program each Sunday morning to fill out and submit.  Or send an e-mail to Leila at ldh1218@sbcglobal.net or to Anne at k9hobbyhome@gmail.com with your favorites, no limit.  We need only the Hymn number and first line.

 

Prayer List

The Prayer List was edited last week.  If we have removed someone still in need of our prayers or if you have anyone else to add, please contact Leila at ldh1218@sbcglobal.net or (707) 263-4565.

 

A New Parish Directory is in the Works   

Arden Hyatt has agreed to create a new St. John’s parish roster, once she gets everybody’s updated information. Please double-check your addresses, e-mails and phone numbers in the sample roster on the narthex table at the rear of the church. We want to stay in touch with all of you! And, thank you, Arden for your valuable roster ministry!

Suzanne LaFaver 

  

 

 

ALTAR GUILD

The Altar Guild is looking for new members, if this is a ministry you would like to be a part of or if you would like more information please contact Barbara Knight, or another Altar Guild member.

 

 

From Lesser Feasts and Fasts...

June 14 - Basil the Great, Bishop of Caesarea, 379

Basil was born about 329, in Caesarea of Cappadocia, into a Christian family of wealth and distinction. Educated in classical Hellenism, Basil might have continued in academic life, had it not been for the death of a beloved younger brother and the faith of his sister, Macrina. He was baptized at the age of twenty-eight, and ordained a deacon soon after.

Macrina had founded the first monastic order for women at Annesi. Fired by her example, Basil made a journey to study the life of anchorites in Egypt and elsewhere. In 358 he returned to Cappadocia and founded the first monastery for men at Ibora. Assisted by Gregory Nazianzus, he compiled The Longer and Shorter Rules, which transformed the solitary anchorites into a disciplined community of prayer and work. The Rules became the foundation for all Eastern monastic discipline. The monasteries also provided schools to train leaders for Church and State.

Basil was ordained presbyter in 364. In the conflict between the Arians (supported by an Arian Emperor) and orthodox Christians, Basil became convinced that he should be made Bishop of Caesarea. By a narrow margin, he was elected Bishop of Caesarea, Metropolitan of Cappadocia, and Exarch of Pontus. He was relentless in his efforts to restore the faith and discipline of the clergy, and in defense of the Nicene faith. When the Emperor Valens sought to undercut Basil’s power by dividing the See of Cappadocia, Basil forced his brother Gregory to become Bishop of Nyssa.

In his treatise, On the Holy Spirit, Basil maintained that both the language of Scripture and the faith of the Church require that the same honor, glory, and worship is to be paid to the Spirit as to the Father and the Son. It was entirely proper, he asserted, to adore God in liturgical prayer, not only with the traditional words, “Glory to the Father through the Son in the Holy Spirit;” but also with the formula, “Glory to the Father with the Son together with the Holy Spirit.”

Basil was also concerned about the poor, and when he died, he willed to Caesarea a complete new town, built on his estate, with housing, a hospital and staff, a church for the poor, and a hospice for travelers.

He died at the age of fifty, in 379, just two years before the Second Ecumenical Council, which affirmed the Nicene faith.

Let us pray. Almighty God, you have revealed to your Church your eternal Being of glorious majesty and perfect love as one God in Trinity of Persons: Give us grace that, like your bishop Basil of Caesarea, we may continue steadfast in the confession of this faith, and constant in our worship of you, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit; for you live and reign for ever and ever. Amen.

 

June 15 - Evelyn Underhill

The only child of a prominent barrister and his wife, Evelyn Underhill was born in Wolverhampton England, and grew up in London. She was educated there and in a girls’ school in Folkestone, where she was confirmed in the Church of England. She had little other formal religious training, but her spiritual curiosity was naturally lively, and she read widely, developing quite early a deep appreciation for mysticism. At sixteen, she began a life-long devotion to writing.

Evelyn had few childhood companions, but one of them, Hubert Stuart Moore, she eventually married. Other friends, made later, included such famous persons as Laurence Housman, Maurice Hewlett, and Sarah Bernhardt. Closest of all were Ethel Ross Barker, a devout Roman Catholic, and Baron Friedrich von HŸgel, with whom she formed a strong spiritual bond. He became her director in matters mystical.

In the 1890’s, Evelyn began annual visits to the Continent, and especially to Italy. There she became influenced by the paintings of the Italian masters and by the Roman Catholic Church. She spent nearly fifteen years wrestling painfully with the idea of converting to Roman Catholicism, but decided in the end that it was not for her.

In 1921, Evelyn Underhill became reconciled to her Anglican roots, while remaining what she called a “Catholic Christian.” She continued with her life of reading, writing, meditation, and prayer. She had already published her first great spiritual work, Mysticism. This was followed by many other books, culminating in her most widely read and studied book, Worship (1937).

Evelyn Underhill’s most valuable contribution to spiritual literature must surely be her conviction that the mystical life is not only open to a saintly few, but to anyone who cares to nurture it and weave it into everyday experience, and also (at the time, a startling idea) that modern psychological theories and discoveries, far from hindering or negating spirituality, can actually enhance and transform it.

Evelyn Underhill’s writings proved appealing to many, resulting in a large international circle of friends and disciples, making her much in demand as a lecturer and retreat director. She died, at age 65, in 1941.

Let us pray. O God, Origin, Sustainer, and End of all creatures: Grant that thy Church, taught by thy servant Evelyn Underhill, guarded evermore by thy power, and guided by thy Spirit into the light of truth, may continually offer to thee all glory and thanksgiving, and attain with thy saints to the blessed hope of everlasting life, which thou hast promised us by our Savior Jesus Christ; who with thee and the same Holy Spirit liveth and reigneth, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

 

June 16 - Joseph Butler, Bishop of Durham, 1752

Joseph Butler, once called “the greatest of all the thinkers of the English Church,” was born at Wantage, Berkshire, May 18, 1692, into a Presbyterian family. He was educated at dissenting academies; but in his early twenties he decided to become an Anglican. He entered Oriel College, Oxford, in 1715, and was ordained in 1718.

As a preacher at the Rolls Chapel for eight years, he made his mark, especially for his sermons on human nature. He served as rector of Houghton-le-Skerne (1712–25) and of Stanhope (1715–40), and as prebendary of Rochester (1736–38), before his appointment as Bishop of Bristol. He declined the primacy of Canterbury, but accepted the bishopric of Durham in 1750. He died at Bath, June 16, 1752, and was buried in Bristol Cathedral.

Butler’s fame rests chiefly on his acute apology for orthodox Christianity against the Deistic thought prevalent in England in his time, The Analogy of Religion, Natural and Revealed, to the Constitution and Course of Nature, published in 1736. By careful argument, Butler maintained the “reasonable probability” of Christianity, with action upon that probability as a basis for faith. His rationalism was grounded in a deep personal piety, although he had little sympathy for the enthusiasm of the Wesleyan revival movement. Yet, in their different ways, Bishop Butler and John Wesley contributed to the renewal of the Church in eighteenth century England.

Let us pray. O God, by your Holy Spirit you give to some the word of wisdom, to others the word of knowledge, and to others the word of faith: We praise your Name for the gifts of grace manifested in your servant Joseph Butler, and we pray that your Church may never be destitute of such gifts; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who with you and the Holy Spirit lives and reigns, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

 

June 17 - The First Book of Common Prayer 

The first Book of Common Prayer came into use on the Day of Pentecost, June 9, 1549, in the second year of the reign of King Edward the Sixth. From it have descended all subsequent editions and revisions of the Book in the Churches of the Anglican Communion.

Though prepared by a commission of learned bishops and priests, the format, substance, and style of the Prayer Book were primarily the work of Thomas Cranmer, Archbishop of Canterbury, 1533–1556. The principal sources employed in its compilation were the medieval Latin service books of the Use of Sarum (Salisbury), with enrichments from the Greek liturgies, certain ancient Gallican rites, the vernacular German forms prepared by Luther, and a revised Latin liturgy of the reforming Archbishop Hermann of Cologne. The Psalter and other biblical passages were drawn from the English “Great Bible” authorized by King Henry the Eighth in 1539, and the Litany was taken from the English form issued as early as 1544.

The originality of the Prayer Book, apart from the felicitous translations and paraphrases of the old Latin forms, lay in its simplification of the complicated liturgical usages of the medieval Church, so that it was suitable for use by the laity as well as by the clergy. The Book thus became both a manual of common worship for Anglicans and a primary resource for their personal spirituality.

Let us pray. Almighty and everliving God, whose servant Thomas Cranmer, with others, did restore the language of the people in the prayers of thy Church: Make us always thankful for this heritage; and help us so to pray in the Spirit and with the understanding, that we may worthily magnify thy holy Name; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

 

June 18 - Bernard Mizeki, 

Catechist and Martyr in Rhodesia, 1896

Bernard Mizeki was born about the year 1861 in Portuguese East Africa (Mozambique). In his early teens he escaped from his native land and arrived in Capetown, South Africa, where he was befriended and converted by Anglican missionaries. He was baptized on March 9, 1886.

In 1891 Bernard Mizeki volunteered as a catechist for the pioneer mission in Mashonaland, and was stationed at Nhowe. In June, 1896, during an uprising of the native people against the Europeans and their African friends, Bernard was marked out especially. Though warned to flee, he would not desert his converts at the mission station. He was stabbed to death, but his body was never found, and the exact site of his burial is unknown.

A shrine near Bernard’s place of martyrdom attracts many pilgrims today, and the Anglican Churches of Central and of South Africa honor him as their primary native martyr and witness.

Let us pray. Almighty and everlasting God, who kindled the flame of your love in the heart of your holy martyr Bernard Mizeki: Grant to us, your humble servants, a like faith and power of love, that we who rejoice in his triumph may profit by his example; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

 

Please pray for...

For our Church and Clergy: ‡Justin, Archbishop of Canterbury; ‡Katharine, Presiding Bishop; +Barry, our Bishop; Fr. Leo+, our Parish Priest; Bryan, our Deacon; the clergy & people of the Diocese of Northern California; and Christians in the Holy Land and Middle East.

For all in need, especially: Fr. Leo+, Deacon Bryan, Rev. Blake+ Leighton, AnneBarquist, June Salter, Ron Eileen Martin, Norah & Jerry Collins, Michael Clore, JaneDuffty, Clementine Hall, Chrystina Harris, Jeff Norton.

 (To add to the prayer list, contact Leila: 263-4565 or ldh1218@sbcglobal.net)

 

Announcements

If you would like to host the Hospitality Hour after Sunday Service please sign the  Hospitality Hour Schedule in Carey Hall.

Please bring offerings of nonperishable foods for the Food Pantry. As we continue our outreach to the needy in our community, your donations are always appreciated and needed to sustain this vital service.  Also, your monetary donations are always appreciated and needed to sustain this vital service. Your dollar buys much more food when we purchase in bulk. 

 Thank you.

Opportunity to serve St. John’s: If you’re friendly and frequent thrift stores, perhaps you’re just the person to volunteer in the thrift Shop.  Volunteers are needed, especially to help sort the overstock.   Even an hour or two would be appreciated. If you’re interested, leave a message for Ginger Ingersol, thrift shop manager, at (707) 245-3147.  The shop is openTuesdayWednesday and Thursday 10 to 4 in the Church basement. 

Until further notice, the Thrift Store is not accepting donations. Volunteers are needed, especially to help sort the overstock; even an hour or two helps.  Please speak to Ginny Ingersoll or Deborah Smith if you can help.

The Food Pantry needs nonperishable foods.                                                                                                                                                               

You can reach Fr. Leo at 349-6563 or e-mail frleo@yahoo.com

 

“Focus on the mission; stay together; 

keep moving forward,in the Name of Christ.”  

(Bishop Barry Beisner)




May 24, 2014, 8:14 AM

May 23, 2014

The St. John's Herald

The voice of the Episcopal Church in Lake County

St. John's Church

(Episcopal)

1190 North Forbes Street, Lakeport, California 95453

 

You can reach Fr. Leo at 349-6563 or e-mail frleo@yahoo.com

 

St. John’s Church vision statement:

We are a visible, welcoming family of Christ, 

resolved to deepen our relationship with God.

 

 

May 23, 2014

 

Dear Folks,

If you missed getting The Herald last week that is because I was not able to send it out. The morning of Friday, May 16th I took a sudden and serious down turn and my life, such as it is, went on hold. I was able to notify our Senior Warden, Suzanne LaFaver, so she could organize our able Lay Ministry team and I am told they did a great job of adapting the Sunday Service into a Liturgy of the Word. I thank them for doing such a great job at such short notice. Other than that, my memory of the following days is pretty much a blank due to the physical pain and the heavy duty pain meds needed to get through it. I really did not know if I was going to make it through, but, thanks be to God and the ready response of my Hospice team, I started to improve a few days ago. Many of you were concerned and all day Wednesday, my Birthday, the phone was ringing with calls of good wishes and concern. Yesterday I started to get my mind back on line and today was even better enabling me to work on putting The Herald together. Thank you for all the Birthday cards and calls. We have scheduled a supply priest, The Rev. Karen King, to celebrate Holy Eucharist and preach this Sunday and I plan to be with you again on June 1st.

The evening before my down turn, I was happy to be taken to the open house for the Hospice Services of Lake County new facility on Parallel Drive. It was a great pleasure to see their new center, converted from a former church and parsonage, that will enable them to continue their valuable service in more amenable surroundings. 

There are many things coming up week that I have tried to cover in the various articles in this edition. I hope you all have a fun filled holiday weekend, but please do not overlook the original purpose of the holiday. Remember in prayer and thanksgiving all the women and men who have given their lives for our country. 

On Thursday, Ascension Day, our former priest, Father Harry Allagree will visit me here at the Hermitage and we will celebrate Holy Eucharist in the early afternoon in the Oratory. If you would like to join us, please call for the exact time.  

 

    Please continue to keep me in your prayers and love as I  keep going, for as long as it is God’s Will, to serve you as your parish priest.      

    God love you,

Fr. Leo+

 

Organ Music for Sunday, May 25th

Prelude: Wondrous King  H. Metzger, Germany   1900's

Offertory: Praise the Lord  R. Weinhorst, Valparaiso 1900's

Postlude: Fantasia in C Major JS Bach, Germany   1600's

Mel Taylor, Parish Organist

 

Movement classes at St. John’s  Church  

Tuesday & Thursday morning classes at 10:15 a.m. are taught by Michelle Duguay and focus on restorative yoga for relaxation & stress management.

Duguay also teaches Monday/Wednesday/Friday classes at 9 a.m. focusing on movement for continuing students and 10:30 a.m.gentle yoga for all levels.

Tuesday Pilates classes at 1 p.m. and Thursday at 9 a.m. are taught by Tina Woelbling-Hamner and focus on re-educating movement patterns for efficient and functional everyday movement.

All classes are offered on a donation basis.  No one will be turned away for lack of funds.  Students are encouraged to bring their own mats. 

 

MEMORIAL DAY, MAY 26TH

Memorial Day, originally called Decoration Day, is a day of remembrance for those who have died in service of the United States of America. Over two dozen cities and towns claim to be the birthplace of Memorial Day. While Waterloo N.Y. was officially declared the birthplace of Memorial Day by President Lyndon Johnson in May 1966, it’s difficult to prove conclusively the origins of the day.

Regardless of the exact date or location of its origins, one thing is clear – Memorial Day was borne out of the Civil War and a desire to honor our dead. It was officially proclaimed on 5 May 1868 by General John Logan, national commander of the Grand Army of the Republic, in his General Order No. 11. “The 30th of May, 1868, is designated for the purpose of strewing with flowers, or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village and hamlet churchyard in the land,” he proclaimed. The date of Decoration Day, as he called it, was chosen because it wasn’t the anniversary of any particular battle.

On the first Decoration Day, General James Garfield made a speech at Arlington National Cemetery, and 5,000 participants decorated the graves of the 20,000 Union and Confederate soldiers buried there.

The first state to officially recognize the holiday was New York in 1873. By 1890 it was recognized by all of the northern states. The South refused to acknowledge the day, honoring their dead on separate days until after World War I (when the holiday changed from honoring just those who died fighting in the Civil War to honoring Americans who died fighting in any war).

It is now celebrated in almost every state on the last Monday in May with Congressional passage of the National Holiday Act of 1971 (P.L. 90 – 363). This helped ensure a three day weekend for Federal holidays, though several southern states have an additional separate day for honoring the Confederate war dead: January 19thin Texas; April 26th in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and Mississippi; May 10th in South Carolina; and June 3rd (Jefferson Davis’ birthday) in Louisiana and Tennessee.

 

Red Poppies

In 1915, inspired by the poem “In Flanders Fields,” Moina Michael replied with her own poem:

We cherish too, the Poppy red

That grows on fields where valor led,

It seems to signal to the skies

That blood of heroes never dies.

She then conceived of an idea to wear red poppies on Memorial day in honor of those who died serving the nation during war. She was the first to wear one, and sold poppies to her friends and co-workers with the money going to benefit servicemen in need. Later a Madam Guerin from France was visiting the United States and learned of this new custom started by Ms. Michael. When she returned to France she made artificial red poppies to raise money for war orphaned children and widowed women. This tradition spread to other countries. In 1921, the Franco-American Children’s League sold poppies nationally to benefit war orphans of France and Belgium. The League disbanded a year later and Madam Guerin approached the VFW for help.

Shortly before Memorial Day in 1922 the VFW became the first veterans’ organization to nationally sell poppies. Two years later their “Buddy” Poppy program was selling artificial poppies made by disabled veterans. In 1948 the US Post Office honored Ms. Michael for her role in founding the National Poppy movement by issuing a red 3 cent postage stamp with her likeness on it.

 

Rogation Days and Ascension Thursday

The week of the Sixth Sunday of Easter is busy with processions and outdoor activities. The week begins with prayers and celebrations that focus on stewardship of creation and culminates in the great (but lately much-neglected) Feast of the Ascension of our Lord into heaven on the fortieth day of the Paschal Feast.

 

Rogation Days

The Rogation Days, the MondayTuesday, and Wednesdaybefore Ascension Day, originated in Vienne, France (not Vienna, Austria), in 470 after a series of natural disasters had caused much suffering among the people. Archbishop Mamertus proclaimed a fast and ordered that special litanies and prayers be said as the population processed around their fields, asking God's protection and blessing on the crops that were just beginning to sprout. The Latin word rogare means "to ask", thus these were "rogation" processions. In an agricultural society, closely connected with the soil and highly vulnerable to the uncertainties of nature, this was an idea that took root quickly, and the custom spread around Europe and over to Britain. The Sunday before the Rogation Days came to be considered a part of Rogationtide (or "Rogantide") and was known as Rogation Sunday. The Gospel formerly appointed for that day was from John 16, where Jesus tells his disciples toask, and ye shall receive.

While technically they were days of fasting, for which they were also known as "Grass Days," for the meatless meals that were enjoined, the Rogation Days developed into a popular festival, celebrating the arrival of spring and serving other purposes, as well. Other names for these days include "Gang Days," from the Anglo-Saxon gangen, "to go," and "Cross Days," both titles signifying the processions with crosses and banners around the countryside. In some parishes, the procession took more than one day and the whole business became an occasion for several days of picnics and revels of all sorts, particularly among those who trooped along at the fringes of the religious aspects of the procession.

The route of the walk was around the boundaries of the parish, which was a civil as well as a religious unit. Thus, the processions were useful in teaching people, particularly the young, their parish boundaries. Known as "beating the bounds," the processions customarily stopped at boundary marks and other significant landmarks of the parish, such as a venerable tree, or a great rock, or perhaps a pond. The priest would read the Gospel and perhaps affix a cross to the landmark. Then the boys of the parish would suffer some indignity intended to help them remember the spot. Boys were bumped about against rocks and trees, thrown into the water, held upside-down over fences, thrown into bramble patches, or beaten with willow wands--and then given a treat in compensation. In later times, the marchers beat the boundary marker with the willow wands, beating the bounds, rather than the boys. 

The reminder of boundaries had another important impact on communal life. In a poem by the 20th century American Robert Frost, the poet's neighbor asserts that "good fences make good neighbors." Boundaries are often very important in relationships. As members of parishes beat the bounds, they would often encounter obstructions and violations of boundaries. The annual beating of the bounds provided an opportunity to resolve boundary issues. It also led to the tradition of seeking reconciliation in personal relationships during Rogationtide. The sharing of a specially brewed ale, called Ganging Beer, and a mysterious pastry, called Rammalation Biscuits, at the end of the walk was a good way of sealing the reconciliation.

George Herbert gave the following good reasons to beat the bounds: 1) a blessing of God for the fruits of the field; 2) Justice in the preservation of the bounds; 3) Charitie, in living, walking and neighbourliy accompanying one another, with reconciling of differences at that time, if they be any; 4) Mercie, in relieving the poor by a liberal distribution of largess which at that time is or oght be made.

The custom of placing crosses on boundary markers and in the fields seems to derive from the fact that the Rogation Days fall near the old feast day of the Invention (or Finding) of the Cross. Crouchmas ("Cross-mass") was on May 3rd and it was the custom on that day to place crosses in fields and gardens as a way of blessing them and praying for them to be fruitful. While full Rogation processions are rare today, the blessing of crosses to be planted in the fields of the faithful is one of the ways the older customs survive.

 

Keeping the Rogation Days Today

Much of modern society has lost its direct connection with the soil, but this psychological distance does not lessen the actual dependence of all people on the gifts of nature. Furthermore, responsible stewardship of all of these gifts is increasingly being recognized as the concern of all people. Days of thanksgiving, harvest festivals, and the like are observed in many churches at the end of the growing season. The Rogation Days at the time of planting have become little more than a liturgical footnote in the American Prayer Book, but in these times of growing ecological concern the Church would do well to revive them.

Practically speaking, the revival of Rogation observances is likely to involve more people if they are part of a Sunday service. It should be added that, while the Sixth Sunday of Easter is the traditional day, some adaptation to the local season and climate would be appropriate. After all, there is little point in blessing fields and seeds for planting at the time when crops are being harvested in the southern hemisphere. Similarly, there will be many places where farms and rural countryside will not be the locale of processions and blessings. But even in urban churches there should be an awareness of our dependence upon the fruits and resources of the earth, of the ways in which resources are wasted, of the dangers of pollution, and of our responsibility for honest labor and industry.

A Rogation observance in church, then, can be the opportunity for a homily on the Christian stewardship of natural resources. Various symbols can be introduced into the liturgy to reinforce this theme. A procession around the whole parish might not be a possibility, but a procession around the church grounds, a local park, or a parishioner's farm would be appropriate. Parishioners can bring their own garden seeds to be blessed and crosses can be blessed for parishioners to take home and plant in their fields or gardens. Making the crosses would be a good project for the children of the church school or individual families. If the children made Easter gardens, the plants in them can be transplanted to either the parish garden or their family gardens at home, adapting some of the prayers below. Even though theSunday readings no longer keep the Rogation theme, the hymns can. Hymns and canticles that fit the Rogation theme include, "O Jesus crowned with all renown", "Fairest Lord Jesus", "We plow the fields and scatter", "Now the green blade rises", "O worship the King", Benedicite, omnia opera, and Psalm 65.

Reconciliation is an important part of the Rogation tradition and should not be overlooked. It is rooted in respect for appropriate boundaries, in the proper ordering of every element of creation, and, most of all, in the forgiveness which Jesus himself extended to those who crucified him. Reconciliation is not just about confession to God and absolution, nor is it merely a formal liturgical rite. Rather, it is about face-to-face reconciliation with our neighbor, and most especially our neighbor within the Church. Thus, one of the stopping points of the Rogation procession should be a place where reconciliation is the theme, with an appropriate reading from Scripture (e.g., 1 John 4:13-21) and a homily calling on everyone in the parish to seek to resolve outstanding differences before the day is over. Whenever possible, the priest and other members of the parish should make concrete efforts to bring together those who need to be reconciled. This prayer attributed to St. Francis of Assisi may be used:

Lord, make us instruments of your peace. Where there is hatred, let us sow love; where there is injury, pardon; where there is discord, union; where there is doubt, faith; where there is despair, hope; where there is darkness, light; where there is sadness, joy. Grant that we may not so much seek to be consoled as to console; to be understood as to understand; to be loved as to love. For it is in giving that we receive; it is in pardoning that we are pardoned; and it is in dying that we are born to eternal life. Amen.

It is traditional for the Rogation services and processions to end with food. Ganging Beer was probably just the seasonal brew at the local pub, so for those who want to keep that part of the tradition, any good local brew would serve the purpose well. No one seems to have any idea what Rammalation Biscuits were, so invent your own. In any case, unique foods are not required. Have a picnic or a pot luck supper in the church hall. Gladden the body with good food and drink, and  the soul with the fruits of fellowship and reconciliation. (Excerpted by Fr. Leo from the Full Homely Divinity web site.)

 

Ascension Day

Then he led them out as far as Bethany....  While he blessed them, he parted from them, and was carried up into heaven.  (Luke 24:50-51)

While Luke places the Ascension in Bethany, the tradition "on the ground" stops short of Bethany, on top of the Mount of Olives.  A stone inside the domed chapel there has traces of the footprints of Jesus before he ascended.  Although most modern Christians have long since foresworn the literal concept of a "three-storied universe," the notion of Ascension nevertheless directs us upwards, symbolically.  After all, no matter where one locates heaven, the biblical account still records that the last time the disciples saw the Risen Lord, he was going up.

So, for us, as well as for ancient Christians, this is the consummate "mountaintop experience" and, consequently, traditions associated with keeping this feast take us both out and up.

Regrettably, Ascension Day is becoming a forgotten, or at least a displaced feast. Some provinces of the Roman Catholic Church now transfer the observance to the following Sunday and we have observed that many Episcopal churches ignore it altogether. This seems to reflect and even support the growing tendency among many Christians to focus their liturgical involvement with the church on Sunday. To some extent, this is a consequence of the demanding schedules of modern life, but we are sure that there are other reasons, as well. Needless to say, reversing the tendency to a kind of practical sabbatarianism is an important part of what Full Homely Divinity is about. Homely divinity is daily divinity. And daily divinity welcomes the festal interruption to ordinary routines every day of the week, and not just on Sunday

Liturgy

Renewing the active observance of this feast calls for a consideration of some of the liturgical customs that once distinguished it. Traditionally, the Paschal Candle was extinguished following the reading of the Gospel on Ascension Day. The gentle ascent and disappearance of the smoke from the smoldering wick was a poignant symbol of the departure of the Risen Lord from the earth.  Now, it is customary in many places to keep the Candle burning until Pentecost and to omit entirely any special ceremony of extinguishing it. There are credible reasons for this change. On the other hand, it is noteworthy that so little attention is given to the extinguishing of this Candle which was lit with major ceremony at the beginning of the Paschal Vigil and holds a place of such prominence in the church building throughout the season.

Like the Church at large, we at FHD are not of one mind on this practice. However, apart from the rites of the Church set forth by authority (i.e., The Book of Common Prayer), it is never our intent to prescribe, only to suggest. The rubric regarding the Paschal Candle in the American Prayer Book (p. 287) says "It is customary that the Paschal Candle burn at all services from Easter Day through the Day of Pentecost." At the risk of being accused of nitpicking, we note that "customary" is a relative term. Customs vary over both time and space and we are simply pointing out that this is one that is not universal. It has changed before and it could change again. Some of us see value in the old custom, and like it enough to keep it alive.

There are other liturgical customs for this day which have also fallen by the way. One such custom was the lifting up of a statue or picture of Christ.

In some places, this was quite elaborate, with ropes or chains rigged to elevate the image. In some places, it disappeared behind a veil or into a representation of clouds, while in others it went through a hole in the ceiling. After the image vanished, the congregation would be showered with rose petals and other flowers, symbolizing the gifts which the ascended Christ gives to his Church:  When he ascended on high he made captivity itself a captive; he gave gifts to his people....that some would be apostles, some prophets, some evangelists, some pastors and teachers....(Ephesians 4:7,11)

In Germany, it was the custom for the priest to lift high a crucifix after the reading of the Ascension Gospel.  This custom has much to recommend it. It makes visible the symbolic link between the Cross and the Ascension which is implicit in Jesus' words when he says, And I, when I am lifted up from the earth, will draw all people to myself. (John 12:32

On the Cross, Jesus is glorified. When he ascends, he ascends to reign in glory. It could be a simple, yet effective, bit of liturgical drama to revive this custom. An extra acolyte, carrying a crucifix, could be added to the Gospel procession on Ascension Day. Or, if the parish owns a processional cross which has a figure of Christ on it, that should be carried at the head of the Gospel procession. It is important for this particular ceremony that the cross not be empty. While in many contexts an empty cross is an effective symbol, here the focus is on Christ himself, so a crucifix is needed. At the conclusion of the reading of the Gospel, instead of lifting the Gospel book and proclaiming "The Gospel of the Lord," the deacon or priest should exchange the book for the crucifix, and lift it high. It is still appropriate to say "The Gospel of the Lord," for the uplifted figure of Christ on the cross is indeed the Good News (Gospel) that we proclaim and celebrate. A processional crucifix would be especially dramatic as it would enable the Gospeller to lift the figure very high.

Processions

Ascension Day has always been a day for processions, following the example of Jesus who led the disciples out of Jerusalem and up the Mount of Olives. In the Middle Ages, these processions went out into the streets of the town, and everyone took part. In England a banner depicting a lion trampling the devil under his foot was often carried at the head of the procession, symbolizing the triumph of the ascended Christ over the evil one. In the course of the medieval processions in larger towns and cathedral cities, there were stops along the way to view pageants. These medieval pageants, enacted during processions on several of the greater feasts, were designed to teach the unlettered faithful about the feast and were the basis for the more elaborate cycles of mystery plays that became a centerpiece of the feast of Corpus Christi.

As with the Rogation processions, the liturgical processions of Ascension Day had their non-liturgical aspects.  In time, the liturgical procession evolved into a holiday hike, with hills and mountaintops as their destination. This is the logical focus for a family observance of the feast. After attending the Ascension Day Eucharist, or on the weekend following, take a picnic lunch or supper and hike to the top of the highest hill or mountain around. If hiking is not possible for some reason, drive, but go up to the heights. At the beginning of the trip, read Luke 24:50-52 and say this prayer:

Grant, we pray, Almighty God, that as we believe your only-begotten Son our Lord Jesus Christ to have ascended into heaven, so we may also in heart and mind there ascend, and with him continually dwell; who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

On the way, sing or say Psalm 47, which proclaims: God is gone up with a merry noise. If you have a portable tape or CD player, play a recording of a choir singing the psalm or the anthems based on it by Orlando Gibbons, William Croft, or Gerald Finzi, or other Ascension Day music. When you reach the top of the hill, read the story of the Ascension in Acts 1:6-11 and say this prayer:

Almighty God, whose blessed Son our Savior Jesus Christ ascended far above all heavens that he might fill all things: Mercifully give us faith to perceive that, according to his promise, he abides with his Church on earth, even to the end of the ages; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, in glory everlasting. Amen.

Take time to notice the clouds, if there are any that day (and hope that they are not pouring rain!) There is an old tradition that the clouds on Ascension Day take the form of lambs, in honor of the Lamb of God. See what shapes you can find among the clouds. You could also make your own clouds with incense or if you light a fire to cook on. 

Food

Every feast has its food traditions and Ascension Day is no exception. Some of them could be incorporated into your picnic lunch or supper. In keeping with the day's theme of upward flight, it is traditional to eat fowl: pigeon, partridge, pheasant, and even crow have been known to make it into the menu. Unless you are a hunter, Cornish game hen or duck from the market will be more readily available, and definitely more palatable than crow. German chefs make pastries in the shape of birds, a good alternative for vegetarians. As Christ is the first fruits of the dead, the blessing and eating of first fruits of the earth is a custom in warmer climates. Northerners will have to improvise, but will have no trouble finding many possibilities in well stocked modern produce markets. Italians take beans and grapes to church to be blessed, these being foods that their tradition says are eaten by the people released from Limbo when Christ ascended.  The grape leaf is one of the first to sprout in the spring, so Armenians make Dolmas, stuffed grape leaves, to eat on Ascension Day. For dessert, even though they are not traditional, how about cloud-like puffs of white meringues, or a pie topped with meringue?

 

Novenas

The nine days from Ascension Day to the Eve of Pentecost are the original novena--nine days of prayer. Before he ascended, Jesus ordered the disciples not to leave Jerusalem, but to wait there to be baptized by the Holy Spirit. After his Ascension, they returned to the upper room in Jerusalem where they devoted themselves to prayer. These last days of the Great Fifty Days of Easter can be a time for us to prepare for the celebration of Pentecost. As we anticipate the coming of the Holy Spirit, this can be a time to pray for renewal in the Spirit and a time to reflect on the gifts which the Spirit bestows on the Church. The prayer for the newly baptized, p. 308, in the 1979 Book of Common Prayer is the traditional prayer for the seven gifts of the Spirit, based on the prophecy of Isaiah 11:2-3. This prayer could be the basis for daily reflection on the gifts of the Spirit in the days between the Ascension and Pentecost and the following adaptation of it could be used daily as a simplified novena.

Heavenly Father, we thank you that by water and the Holy Spirit you have bestowed upon us the forgiveness of sin, and have raised us to the new life of grace in your Son Jesus Christ. Sustain us, O Lord, in the gifts of your Spirit: an inquiring and discerning heart, the courage to will and to persevere, a spirit to know and to love you, and the gift of joy and wonder in all your works. Amen.

Or, here is a fuller novena, based on the sevenfold gifts of the Spirit. It may be used at the conclusion of the Daily Office or as a separate act of devotion.

 

A Novena for the Gifts of the Spirit

Come, Holy Ghost, our souls inspire,

and lighten with celestial fire.

Thou the anointing Spirit art,

who dost thy sevenfold gifts impart.

Thy blessed unction from above

is comfort, life, and fire of love.

Enable with perpetual light

the dullness of our blinded sight.

Anoint and cheer our soiled face

with the abundance of thy grace.

Keep far our foes, give peace at home:

where thou art guide, no ill can come.

Teach us to know the Father, Son,

and thee with both to be but One,

that through the ages all along,

this may be our endless song:

praise to thy eternal merit,

Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Amen.

Come, great Paraclete, Father of the poor, Comforter of the blest, fulfill the promise of our Savior who would not leave us as orphans. Enter our minds and hearts as you descended on the day of Pentecost upon the Mother of Jesus and upon his Apostles. Grant that every member of the Church may have a part in those gifts which were bestowed that day. O Holy Spirit, giver of every good and perfect gift, may the Father's will be done in us and through us, and may you, O mighty Spirit, equal to the Father and the Son in Being and majesty, be praised and glorifed for ever and ever. Amen.

Here may be added any of the following prayers: Our Father, Hail Mary, Trisagion, Kyrie eleison, Gloria Patri, concluding with the prayer appropriate to the day of the novena.

First Day

Come, O Holy Spirit, the Lord and Lifegiver: Take up your dwelling within my soul and make of it your sacred temple. Make me live by grace as an adopted child of God. Pervade all the energies of my soul, and create in me a fountain of living water springing up into life everlasting; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Father, one God, in Trinity of Persons, now and forever. Amen.

Second Day - Wisdom

Come, O Spirit of Wisdom, and reveal to me the mysteries of divine things, their greatness, and power, and beauty. Teach me to love them above and beyond all the transient joys and satisfactions of the mortal world. Show me the way by which I may be able to attain to them and participate in them forever; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Father, one God, in Trinity of Persons, now and forever. Amen.

Third Day - Understanding

Come, O Spirit of Understanding, and enlighten my mind, that I may know and believe all of the mysteries of salvation and discern your hand at work in the world. Teach me to see with your eyes that I may apply my heart unto wisdom in this life and be made worthy to attain to the vision glorious in the life to come; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Father, one God, in Trinity of Persons, now and forever. Amen.

Fourth Day - Counsel

Come, O Spirit of Counsel, help and guide me in all my ways, that I may always do your holy will. Incline my heart to that which is good, turn it away from all that is evil, and direct me by the path of him who is the Way, the Truth, and the Life to the goal of eternal life; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Father, one God, in Trinity of Persons, now and forever. Amen.

Fifth Day - Fortitude

Come, O Spirit of Fortitude, and give courage to my soul. Make my heart strong in all trials and in all distress, generously pouring strength into it that I may be able to resist the allurements of the world, the flesh, and the devil; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Father, one God, in Trinity of Persons, now and forever. Amen.

Sixth Day - Knowledge

Come, O Spirit of Knowledge, and make me understand the emptiness and chaos of life without you. Give me grace to recognize the goodness of the whole creation and to honor the Creator by using the world only for your glory and for the benefit and the salvation of all whom you have made; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Father, one God, in Trinity of Persons, now and forever. Amen.

Seventh Day - Piety

Come, O Spirit of Piety, possess my heart; incline it to a true faith in you, to a holy love of you, my God, that with my whole being I may seek you, and find you to be my best, my truest joy;through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Father, one God, in Trinity of Persons, now and forever.Amen.

Eighth Day - Holy Awe

Come, O Spirit of Holy Awe, penetrate my inmost heart, that I may set you, my Lord and God, before my face forever. In joy and wonder may I be made worthy to appear before the pure eyes of your divine Majesty and behold your glory face to face in the heaven of heavens, where you live and reign in the unity of the Ever-blessed Trinity, now and forever. Amen.

Ninth Day

Come, O Holy Comforter, come in all your fullness and power. Enrich us in our poverty, inflame us in our feebleness, melt our hearts with your love. Make us wholly yours, until your gifts are ours and we are lost in you; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Father, one God, in Trinity of Persons, now and forever. Amen(Excerpted by Fr. Leo from theFull Homely Divinity web site.)

 

 

 

 

 

Prayer for the Kidnapped Nigerian Girls 

May 2014

O God, we cry out to you

for the lives and the freedom

of the 276 kidnapped girls in Nigeria.

In their time of danger and fear,

pour out your strong Spirit for them.  

Make a way home for them in safety. 

Make a way back for them

to the education that will lift them up. 

Hold them in the knowledge 

that they are not captive slaves, 

they are not purchased brides,

but they are your beloved daughters,

and precious in your sight.  

Change the hearts and minds of their kidnappers

and of all who choose violence against women and girls.

Cast down the mighty from their seat,

and lift up the humble and meek,

through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Written by Elizabeth Smith, Diocese of Perth, Australia

 

 

Your Favorite Hymns

We're conducting a survey to learn your favorite hymns, so that we can sing them more often on Sunday morning.  The form is in the program each Sunday morning to fill out and submit.  Or send an e-mail to Leila at ldh1218@sbcglobal.net or to Anne atk9hobbyhome@gmail.com with your favorites, no limit.  We need only the Hymn number and first line.

 

Prayer List

The Prayer List was edited last week.  If we have removed someone still in need of our prayers or if you have anyone else to add, please contact Leila at ldh1218@sbcglobal.net or (707) 263-4565.

 

 

May Birthdays and Anniversaries

Happy Birthday on May 5th to Susanne LaFaver and ClementineHall; on the 7th to Willis Knight; on the  13th to Willie Hewitt; on the 21st to Alethea Eason and Father Leo, and on the 25th toDoris Womack.  

Happy Anniversary on May 2nd to Ron & Eileen Martin.

 

 

 

A New Parish Directory is in the Works   

Arden Hyatt has agreed to create a new St. John’s parish roster, once she gets everybody’s updated information. Please double-check your addresses, e-mails and phone numbers in the sample roster on the narthex table at the rear of the church. We want to stay in touch with all of you! And, thank you, Arden for your valuable roster ministry!

Suzanne LaFaver 

  

 

 

ALTAR GUILD

The Altar Guild is looking for new members, if this is a ministry you would like to be a part of or if you would like more information please contact Barbara Knight, or another Altar Guild member.

 

 

From Lesser Feasts and Fasts...

259

When the General Convention of 1835 made all the members of the Episcopal Church members also of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, it provided at the same time for missionary bishops to serve in the wilderness and in foreign countries. Jackson Kemper was the first such bishop. Although he was assigned to Missouri and Indiana, he laid foundations also in Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Nebraska, and Kansas, and made extensive missionary tours in the South and Southwest.

Kemper was born in Pleasant Valley, New York, on December 24, 1789. He graduated from Columbia College in 1809, and was ordained deacon in 1811, and priest in 1814.

He served Bishop White as Assistant at Christ Church, Philadelphia. At his urging, Bishop White made his first and only visitation in western Pennsylvania. In 1835, Kemper was ordained bishop, and immediately set out on his travels.

Because Episcopal clergymen, mostly from well-to-do Eastern homes, found it hard to adjust to the harsh life of the frontier—scorching heat, drenching rains, and winter blizzards—Kemper established Kemper College in St. Louis, Missouri, the first of many similar attempts to train clergymen, and in more recent times lay persons as well, for specialized tasks in the Church. The College failed in 1845 from the usual malady of such projects in the church—inadequate funding. Nashotah House, in Wisconsin, which he founded in 1842, with the help of James Lloyd Breck and his companions, was more successful. So was Racine College, founded in 1852. Both these institutions reflected Kemper’s devotion to beauty in ritual and worship.

Kemper pleaded for more attention to the Indians, and encouraged the translation of services into native languages. He described a service among Oneida Indians which was marked by “courtesy, reverence, worship—and obedience to that Great Spirit in whose hands are the issues of life.”

From 1859 until his death, Kemper was diocesan Bishop of Wisconsin. He is more justly honored by his unofficial title, “The Bishop of the Whole Northwest.”

Let us pray. Lord God, in your providence Jackson Kemper was chosen first missionary bishop in this land, and by his arduous labor and travel congregations were established in scattered settlements of the West: Grant that the Church may always be faithful to its mission, and have the vision, courage, and perseverance to make known to all people the Good News of Jesus Christ; who with you and the Holy Spirit lives and reigns, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

Please pray for...

For our Church and Clergy: ‡Justin, Archbishop of Canterbury;‡Katharine, Presiding Bishop; +Barry, our Bishop; Fr. Leo+, our Parish Priest; Bryan, our Deacon; the clergy & people of the Diocese of Northern California; and Christians in the Holy Land and Middle East.

   

For all in need, especially: Fr. Leo+, Deacon Bryan, Rev. Blake+Leighton, Anne Barquist, June Salter, Ron Eileen Martin,Norah & Jerry Collins, Michael Clore, Jane Duffty, ClementineHall, Chrystina Harris, Jeff Norton.

 (To add to the prayer list, contact Leila: 263-4565 orldh1218@sbcglobal.net)

 

Announcements

If you would like to host the Hospitality Hour after SundayService please sign the  Hospitality Hour Schedule in Carey Hall.

Please bring offerings of nonperishable foods for the Food Pantry. As we continue our outreach to the needy in our community, your donations are always appreciated and needed to sustain this vital service.  Also, your monetary donations are always appreciated and needed to sustain this vital service. Your dollar buys much more food when we purchase in bulk. 

 Thank you.

Opportunity to serve St. John’s: If you’re friendly and frequent thrift stores, perhaps you’re just the person to volunteer in the thrift Shop.  Volunteers are needed, especially to help sort the overstock.   Even an hour or two would be appreciated. If you’re interested, leave a message for Ginger Ingersol, thrift shop manager, at (707) 245-3147.  The shop is open Tuesday,Wednesday and Thursday 10 to 4 in the Church basement. 

Until further notice, the Thrift Store is not accepting donations. Volunteers are needed, especially to help sort the overstock; even an hour or two helps.  Please speak to Ginny Ingersoll or Deborah Smith if you can help.

The Food Pantry needs nonperishable foods.                                                                                                                                                               

You can reach Fr. Leo at 349-6563 or e-mail frleo@yahoo.com

 

“Focus on the mission; stay together; 

keep moving forward,in the Name of Christ.”  

(Bishop Barry Beisner)




May 11, 2014, 10:27 AM

May 10, 21014

The St. John's Herald

The voice of the Episcopal Church in Lake County

St. John's Church

(Episcopal)

1190 North Forbes Street, Lakeport, California 95453

 

You can reach Fr. Leo at 349-6563 or e-mail frleo@yahoo.com

 

St. John’s Church vision statement:

We are a visible, welcoming family of Christ, 

resolved to deepen our relationship with God.

 

 

May 10, 2014

 

Dear Folks,

It is always a felicitous occurrence for me when Good Shepherd Sunday and Mothers Day fall on the same day. Even though Mothers Day is a rather recent Hallmark High Holy Day and the image of Jesus as the Good Shepherd goes to the very heart of the Gospel, the two do in the end share common ground. To begin with, mothering and shepherding are both hard work; and to be a good mother or a good shepherd requires a willingness to “lay down your life” both metaphorically and sometimes literally. Caring, nurturing, leading, and protecting are just a few of the job descriptions that they have in common, as well as an intimate relationship with their charges. 

Julian of Norwich, the medieval English mystic whose feast day we celebrated two days ago, put the two images together in her verse “ Jesus is our true mother,

the protector of the love which knows no end. We have our being from Jesus, where the foundation of motherhood begins...

In nature, Jesus is our true mother by our first creation, and in grace by taking our created nature. All the love of offering and sacrifice of beloved motherhood, are in Christ our Beloved.”

In the formative years of my early adulthood, these two images were impressed upon me by circumstances and   influenced the rest of my life. At twenty three years of age I was called upon to “lay down my life” as it were to care for my mother in the final nine months of her life. On the second anniversary of her death I received the religious habit and the image of the Good Shepherd became the dominate theme of my future life as a pastor. In fact it was on Good Shepherd Sunday, 40 years ago, that I celebrated my “First Mass” at our church in NYC after having been ordained priest in Montreal two weeks earlier. 

Fittingly, I wrap up my priestly ministry here at St. John’s, standing in the pulpit each week facing the striking image of Jesus as the Good Shepherd that graces the west window of our lovely church. Each week I am reminded by that image to pattern my pastoral ministry on that same Gospel concept that had inspired my youthful beginnings. For all the times that I failed to live up to this aspiration, that image never failed me as a guiding star, giving me a constant to which I could correct my course.

May we all be inspired by the Good Shepherd in living out our various vocations in life and give due thanks to God and our mothers for the enduring example of self sacrificing love that we first learned at our mother’s knee.

To all our mothers and those who fulfilled a motherly role in our lives, Happy Mothers Day!

Thanks to an idea that originated with my Hospice counselor, Linda, this past week I was able to spend three days away in Yountville with a dear friend, Michael, with whom,  unfortunately, shares a similar fate as I do. We were able to enjoy each other’s company in gracious surroundings and share some great meals together. A great pre-birthday treat!    

    Please keep me in your prayers and love as I continue to keep going, for as long as it is God’s Will, to serve you as your parish priest.      

    God love you,

Fr. Leo+

 

Organ Music for Sunday, May 11th

Prelude: Hail Thou Once Despised Jesus  E. Weiss, Poland, 1900's

Offertory: All People on Earth Who Dwell  F. Hark, Germany, 1900's

Postlude: The Lord's My Shepherd  D. Buxtehude, Germany,   1600's

Mel Taylor, Parish Organist

 

May Birthdays and Anniversaries

Happy Birthday on May 5th to Susanne LaFaver and Clementine Hall; on the 7th to WillisKnight; on the  13th to Willie Hewitt; on the 21st to Alethea Eason and Father Leo, and on the25th to Doris Womack.  

Happy Anniversary on May 2nd to Ron & Eileen Martin.

 

 

Mental Health Month: 

Faith Education and Collaboration

By Rev. Susan Gregg-Schroeder

May is Mental Health Month and it is quickly approaching. The month offers an opportunity to raise awareness and educate the public about mental illness. This month also presents an opportunity to make connections with other groups in the community addressing mental health issues. There are many excellent educational resources developed by a variety of denominations and national groups for faith communities.

In addition to being a NAMI FaithNet advisory member, I also started Mental Health Ministries as a way to reduce mental health stigma in faith communities. We have three bulletin inserts available in English and Spanish to help raise awareness during Mental Health Month: May is Mental Health Month (English | Spanish), Mental Illness in Children and Adolescents (English | Spanish) and Children’s Mental Health Week (English) as the first week in May focuses on children and youth.

Mental Health Ministries also just released a new DVD, Stories of Healing and Hope: PTSD, Trauma and Suicide, that features our three most recent shows. These shows address the increased attention brought to sexual harassment and the development of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among those serving in the military. These three shows also cover the rise in suicide rates among military personnel. This DVD can serve as a resource for congregations, pastors and other religious officials to help them understand the extent of this problem and the reality of it. This can allow them to provide the proper care and support to those who are affected.

But having educational resources is the first step. The question then becomes, “How will faith leaders learn that these resources exist?” It is helpful for faith communities to find ways to collaborate with groups in their community to raise awareness about mental health and to identify referral information. This kind of collaboration is happening across the country and there are many exciting models that bring together faith leaders, mental health providers, and national groups, such as NAMI. 

One example of someone working to bridge faith communities with the community as a whole is a San Diego couple who shared their story about the suicide of their son. They discovered a way to make a difference by starting the Community Alliance for Health Minds (CAHM) in San Diego. CAHM hosts a yearly forum that brings together partners from mental health organizations, schools and community agencies, survivors and caregivers, pastors and faith providers. Each forum features inspirational speakers and instructive workshops for those who attend this free event. This couple also serves on the councils of two county agencies that are collaborating to reach out to faith communities. The interagency San Diego County Suicide Prevention Council, a subcommittee of the Community Health Improvement Partners (CHIP), will sponsor a breakfast in May for faith leaders. If you are in the San Diego area, I will be speaking at this breakfast and sharing educational resources from Mental Health Ministries that can be added to “tool kits” provided to the participants.

May is designated as Mental Health Month, but it is important to remember that mental health issues affect millions of Americans every single day.  Education and advocacy are necessary all year round.

Rev. Susan Gregg-Schroeder is a member of the NAMI FaithNet Advisory Committee.  Print and media resources are available at the Mental Health Ministries website,www.MentalHealthMinistries.net.

 

 

Day of Prayer for South Sudan

by the Rev. Canon Britt Olson, Canon to the Ordinary in the The Episcopal Diocese of Northern California

The situation in South Sudan continues to deteriorate. More people were killed in April than in the previous months since the eruption of violence that began this past December. In addition, the number of internally displaced persons and refugees has also increased, straining the ability to care for their needs for shelter, food and medical care.

The Episcopal Church in South Sudan has been at the forefront of the movement towards peace. At the same time, church workers, including a number of recently ordained clergy including some of the first women to be ordained, were raped and killed at St. Andrew's Church compound in Bor. To read more abut this click here.

The Presiding Bishop, the Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts Schori, has called for a Day of Prayer and action on behalf of our sisters and brothers in South Sudan on May 18, 2014. Please include the church and people of South Sudan in your congregation's Prayers of the People on this day. Prayers, photos, videos and information on how to help will soon be available atwww.episcopalchurch.org/sudan.

The Episcopal Diocese of Northern California has a special relationship with South Sudan through the connections we have made over the years there. Many of you gave generously through 2012 Diocesan Convention and continue to give through the Millennium Development Goals to assist and encourage our friends there.

If you would like to take an additional offering, please send a check with "South Sudan" in the memo to:

The Episcopal Diocese of Northern California

350 University Avenue, Suite 280

Sacramento, CA 95825

This will combine with funds we have already designated to South Sudan to build support them during this time of great difficulty.

Please know that your support makes a difference.

 

A New Parish Directory is in the Works   

Arden Hyatt has agreed to create a new St. John’s parish roster, once she gets everybody’s updated information. Please double-check your addresses, e-mails and phone numbers in the sample roster on the narthex table at the rear of the church. We want to stay in touch with all of you! And, thank you, Arden for your valuable roster ministry!

Suzanne LaFaver 

  

 

 

ALTAR GUILD

The Altar Guild is looking for new members, if this is a ministry you would like to be a part of or if you would like more information please contact Barbara Knight, or another Altar Guild member.

 

Please pray for...

For our Church and Clergy: ‡Justin, Archbishop of Canterbury; ‡Katharine, Presiding Bishop;+Barry, our Bishop; Fr. Leo+, our Parish Priest; Bryan, our Deacon; the clergy & people of the Diocese of Northern California; and Christians in the Holy Land and Middle East.

   

For all in need, especially: Fr. Leo+, Deacon Bryan, Rev. Blake+ Leighton, Anne Barquist,June Salter, Ron Eileen Martin, Norah & Jerry Collins, Michael Clore, Jane Duffty,Clementine Hall, Chrystina Harris, Jeff Norton.

 (To add to the prayer list, contact Leila: 263-4565 or ldh1218@sbcglobal.net)

 

Announcements

If you would like to host the Hospitality Hour after Sunday Service please sign the  Hospitality Hour Schedule in Carey Hall.

Please bring offerings of nonperishable foods for the Food Pantry. As we continue our outreach to the needy in our community, your donations are always appreciated and needed to sustain this vital service.  Also, your monetary donations are always appreciated and needed to sustain this vital service. Your dollar buys much more food when we purchase in bulk. 

 Thank you.

Opportunity to serve St. John’s: If you’re friendly and frequent thrift stores, perhaps you’re just the person to volunteer in the thrift Shop.  Volunteers are needed, especially to help sort the overstock.   Even an hour or two would be appreciated. If you’re interested, leave a message for Ginger Ingersol, thrift shop manager, at (707) 245-3147.  The shop is openTuesdayWednesday and Thursday 10 to 4 in the Church basement. 

Until further notice, the Thrift Store is not accepting donations. Volunteers are needed, especially to help sort the overstock; even an hour or two helps.  Please speak to Ginny Ingersoll or Deborah Smith if you can help.

The Food Pantry needs nonperishable foods.                                                                                                                                                               

You can reach Fr. Leo at 349-6563 or e-mail frleo@yahoo.com

 

“Focus on the mission; stay together; 

keep moving forward,in the Name of Christ.”  

(Bishop Barry Beisner)

 

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